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How to Write the Names of Ships and Boats

By Erin Wright

Image of Antique Ship | How to Write the Names of Ships and Boats

We’ll begin by looking at the guidelines for writing ship and boat names without abbreviations and then with abbreviations.

We’ll conclude with a discussion on whether we should use gendered or gender-neutral pronouns for ships and boats.

Ship and Boat Names without Abbreviations

Ship and boat names that don’t start with abbreviations are capitalized and italicized in their entirety. 2

Draken Harald Hårfagre is the world’s largest Viking ship currently sailing.

The criminals escaped on the stolen yacht, fatefully named Found Money .

Important Note: Those who follow The Associated Press Stylebook or the U.S. Navy Style Guide should see the Style Guide Alert at the bottom of this post for an alternative recommendation.

Ship and Boat Names with Abbreviations

Abbreviations before ship and boat names, such as USS (United States Ship), SS (steamship or sailing ship), or HMS (Her [or His] Majesty’s Ship), should not be italicized. However, the rest of the name should be capitalized and italicized. 3

The freighter SS Edmund Fitzgerald sank in Lake Superior in 1975.

Nancy Reagan christened USS Ronald Reagan in 2001.

The Wikipedia article “ Ship Prefixes ” offers an extensive list of additional watercraft abbreviations from around the world.

Periods don’t appear between the abbreviated letters. See “ How to Abbreviate United States ” for information on abbreviating the country’s name in general writing.

Important Note: Those who follow the U.S. Navy Style Guide should see the Style Guide Alert at the bottom of this post for information on using the word the before ship and boat names.

Pronouns for Ships and Boats

Historically, ships and boats have been referred to with female pronouns. 4 This writing style has fallen out of favor and, today, the gender-neutral pronoun it is recommended for all watercraft. 5

Despite this update, I encourage historical authors to research pronoun usage in the time period they are writing about because historically accurate pronouns in dialog can create and maintain authenticity.

Style Guide Alert

The Associated Press Stylebook (AP style) doesn’t recommend italicizing any words, including the names of boats or ships. 6

The U.S. Navy Style Guide , which follows most AP style recommendations, doesn’t recommend italicizing the names of ships or boats, either. 7 Government writers and editors should note that this conflicts with the U.S. Government Publishing Office Manual , which does recommend italics. 8

In addition, the U.S. Navy Style Guide says that the word the shouldn’t be used directly before abbreviations such as USS or HMS. 9

Further Reading: When Should You Capitalize Oceans, Mountains, Lakes, and Other Geographic Features?

1. Encyclopedia Britannica , s.v. “History of Ships,” https://www.britannica.com/technology/ship/History-of-ships .

2. The Chicago Manual of Style , 17th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017), 8.116; “How do I format the name of a ship in MLA style?” Ask the MLA, The MLA Style Center, https://style.mla.org/format-the-name-of-a-ship/ .

3. The Chicago Manual of Style , 17th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017), 8.116; “How do I format the name of a ship in MLA style?” Ask the MLA, The MLA Style Center, https://style.mla.org/format-the-name-of-a-ship/.

4. The Gregg Reference Manual, 11th ed. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011), 326.

5. The Associated Press Stylebook 2020–2022 (New York: Associated Press, 2020), 37; The Chicago Manual of Style , 17th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017), 8.116; “How do I format the name of a ship in MLA style?” Ask the MLA, The MLA Style Center, https://style.mla.org/format-the-name-of-a-ship/.

6. The Associated Press Stylebook 2020–2022 (New York: Associated Press, 2020), 37, 161.

7. U.S. Navy Style Guide , s.v. “ship names,” accessed November 14, 2018, https://www.navy.mil/submit/navyStyleGuide.pdf .

8. U.S. Government Publishing Office Style Manual (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 2016), 11.6. https://www.govinfo.gov/gpo-style-manual .

9. U.S. Navy Style Guide , s.v. “ship names,” https://www.navy.mil/submit/navyStyleGuide.pdf.

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Marine Insight

  • 7 Differences Between a Ship and a Boat

Although everyone knows the difference between a ship and a boat, there are quite a few who often get confused between the two terms. Technically, there is a thin line between them and this often leads to major confusion.

While talking about the difference between a ship and a boat, the first thing that comes to one’s mind is their sizes. Traditionally people consider a ship as a large ocean-going vessel, whereas boats are comparatively quite smaller in size.

To understand the differences between ships and boats, a number of aspects need to be taken into consideration.

Mentioned below are seven main aspects which are taken into account to differentiate between a ship and a boat.

Ship and boat

1.  Size of Ship and Boat

The most important aspect that is considered while stating the difference between a ship and a boat is the size. It is said that the best way to differentiate between a ship and a boat is to remember that “A ship can carry a boat, but a boat cannot carry a ship.”

  Technically speaking, a mode of water transport that weighs at least 500 tonnes or above is categorised as a ship. In comparison, boats are stipulated to be quite compact in their structural size and displacement.

2. Operational Areas

A major difference between ship and boat is that of their areas of operation. Ships are vessels that are operated in oceanic areas and high seas. They usually include cruise vessels , naval ships, tankers , container ships , RoRo ships , and offshore vessels . They are mainly built for cargo/ passenger transportation across oceans.

Boats, in contrast, are operable in smaller/ restricted water areas and include ferrying and towing vessels, sail vessels, paddle vessels, kayaks , canoe , patrolling vessels etc.  Boats are mainly used for smaller purposes and mainly ply in areas near to the coast.

 3 . Navigation and Technology

Technologically, boats are simple vessels with less complicated equipment, systems and operational maintenance requirements.  Since ships are required to be operable for longer time-duration and travel across oceans, they are manned using advanced engineering, heavy machinery, and navigational systems .

This is one of the major differences between a ship and a boat.

Ships are huge in size and therefore they are operated by professionally trained navigators and engineers . A ship requires a captain to operate the ship and guide the crew.

On the other hand, the size of the crew on a boat depends on the size of the boat. It can be one person or a full-fledged crew depending on the size and purpose of the boat.

5. Cargo Capacity

A boat is small to the mid-sized vessel, which has a much lesser cargo-carrying capability as compared to a ship.

Ships are specifically made to carry cargo or passengers or boats, whereas boat is a generic term used for a variety of watercraft.

Mainly boats are used for recreational purposes, fishing, or ferry people.

6. Construction and Design

When it comes to construction and design, ships are complicated structures having a variety of machinery systems and designing aspects for the safety and stability of the ship.

A boat is much simple in construction and build, and has lesser machines and design complexities.

7. Propulsion

A boat can be powered by sails, motor, or human force, whereas a ship has dedicated engines to propel them . (Ships can also be propelled by sails or other advanced propulsion technologies)

Even though all vessels operating in the high seas are referred to as ships, submersible vessels are categorically termed as ‘boats.’

This is mainly because of the fact that in the earlier centuries, submersible vessels could be hoisted on ships till they were required to be used in naval operations.

However, while talking about differences between a ship and a boat, vessels floating on the water surface is mainly considered.

shipyard maersk

The usage of the term ‘ship’ or ‘boat’ also depends on the region it is being used in. People from several countries often refer a medium-sized fishing vessel as a boat, or a medium-sized ferry or a recreational boat as a ship. As can be seen, people have a tendency to generalise a vessel on the basis of its size.

However, it is to note that the difference between a ship and a boat depends on a number of factors as discussed above.

You might also like to read:

  • Types of Sailboats: A Comprehensive Classification
  • A Guide to Different Types of Boats
  • A Guide To Types of Ships
  • Types of Fishing Vessels

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46 comments.

Please i am a National Diploma student of Maritime Academy of Nigeria Oron studying nautical science, i want to know more about the course

Hi.thank its so good and sufficient

As a profesional mariner of over 25 years I would like to “weigh in” on this subject. What I will say is not about the currently accepted distinction between ship and boats, but rather historical. When ships (powered by sails) began to start losing trade to vessels powered by engines (boats) they as an industry attempted to associate these vessels with unplesant attributes like noise, soot, vibration, and in some cases slower speed. The sailoing industry (both cargo and passanger) would say that you could SAIL on a quiet, clean, calm, fast ship or go one of those dirty loud vibrating slow BOATS with an engine. The concept a ship being superior and a boat being inferior was sucessfully instituted. The engine powered vessels simply side stepped the ridicule bestowed on the term “boat” and made bigger, faster, clean, quiet vessels and took the market from the sail powered vessels along with the defination of SHIP for themselves. i wont step into the curret debate of what constitutes a boat or a ship but the origins of the debate stem from new technology (steam engines) fighting over market share.

A large freighter (1000′ x 85′, think of the Edmund Fitzgerald) hauling iron ore on the great lakes is referred to by her crew and company as a boat, never as a ship!

“Boats in contrast, are operable in smaller/ restricted water areas and include ferrying and towing vessels, sail vessels, paddle vessels, kayaks, canoe, patrolling vessels etc. Boats are mainly used for smaller purposes and mainly ply in areas near to the coast.” “Technologically, boats are simple vessels with less complicated equipment, systems and operational maintenance requirements.”

Correct me if I am wrong but, isn’t a submarine classed as a boat? That kind of contradicts what you have stated above.

comment:the any where abroad/indian officers you can any time call me on 30 year’s on merchant officers

You can put a boat on a ship but not visa versa eg life boats…

What is the difference between a boat and a ship?

1. The boat leans to the right when turning right

2. The ship leans to the left when turning right.

This is what I have been told by a old (90 Year old boat capt)

Great reply’s. some years ago while on the QE 2 a passenger asked one of the officers when does this boat dock? The young officer replied. “Madam, this is a Ship not a boat, a boat is those you get into when this ship is sinking!

Hello. May I please ask for some assistance from the forum?

I am writing a blog/journal on the differences between ships and yachts. What has prompted this conversation is the plethora of ‘superyachts’ now plying the international oceans and performing well on deep water passages.

Surely some of these can come under the category of ‘ship’, and not yacht, since many are being built on a larger scale than anything we’ve seen in past years. My understanding of the determination of a ‘ship’ is : Length, Tonnage, Draft and Displacement.

I have read your forum discussion regarding use, but I am still unclear as to where the line is drawn for this category. Many of the ‘superyachts’ carry cars, helicopters, pools, and require very advanced equipment, captain and crew. Perhaps we will soon see this as a real conversation in the industry.

Appreciatively, Rosanne Allen-Hewlett For ‘The LUXE Report’ ( Sailor, racer of only boats and yachts )

I was told that the difference between a ship and a boat is that a ship has a funnel and a boat doesn’t, no matter it’s size….

David Musselwhwite’s comment is the best way to determine a boat of a ship. This holds true for submarines (boats). If it leans into the turn, it is a boat. If it leans out on a turn, it is a ship.

In response to comments about the Edmund Fitzgerald, when you spend your life on one you can call it whatever you want. I am sure they all knew it was a ship, I served 20 years in the Navy and always said I was heading back to the boat even though I knew it was a ship.

While in Boot camp in 1964, US Coast Guard, we were told that a ship is 95 feet or longer and a boat is 94 feet and under. That makes it pretty simple.

With over 30 years in the marine industry including working at sea, ship building and ship repair, I would offer my comments.

Yes all above is true. My understanding is that the bottom line is ” a Ship carries boats ie Lifeboats”. If it doesn’t have a proper lifeboat, it is not a ship.

The best a boat has is dinghies or liferafts etc. Consequently a submarine does NOT carry life boats. There are many broader requirements Size and the ability to navigate very heavy seas, such as those whipped up by a tropical Revolving storm (TRS). It must be designed to travel in the open sea in all weather conditions and have lifeboats that can do the same. They carry cargo or passengers and have a substantial crew to operate it including engineers.

As far as the Edmund Fitzgerald is concerned, these vessels are an enigma. They were large and qualify in most areas, but – was it capable of going to sea and did it have sea-going lifeboats? Ironically it suffered probably as bad a storm as it would have done at sea. The problem is that in fresh water the waters are more treacherous than salt water as they rise up far more quickly.

But then again it sank meaning that it couldn’t handle it. Yes it was a large vessel but was it a Ship – ?

What is difference among?

Marine Boat Marine Ship Marine Craft Ship Boat

What is difference between Marina and Marine?

Being the son of a WW II submariner. My dad cruised the Atlantic of the east coast of US and in many conversations about the war he always called his boat a boat never a ship.Thats it!!

The simplest and most accurate definition I stay with is that a ship can carry a boat but a boat cannot carry a ship . SIZE MATTERS !

Captain chalga: try to form a coherent sentence.

I asked a friend of mine, “What is the difference between a boat and a ship?” He said, “About 100 feet . . .”

Thank you for the information. My husband won this discussion. God Bless all who are bravely floating on/in one. I am terrified of the ocean or even a small lake. You have my utmost respect for your sacrifice. I love seafood but would never know the pleasure of eating it without you brave souls. Thank you.

As a proud Submariner I have to disagree and will always say that I serve on a boat.

There is the Boat of Millions of years,which is a very advanced spacecraft able to.travel the millions of light years betwen Galaxies.

And you have vessels such as the Motor Vessel Arlene out of Port Arthur.

I was once told that a ship had multiple decks and a boat had only one.

When I queried sailing yachts that had berths under part of the deck, it was modified to the deck on a yacht is as much structural as deck, but if a vessel has 2 or more non structural “floors” it is a ship.

Then I mentioned tug boats and fishing boats and it all got confused.

It’s a bit like the difference between horse and pony. Despite every one saying it’s size, the falabella is a horse and polo ponies are ponies.

A naval architect (constructors) view is that to be a ‘ship’ a vessel must have at least one continuous internal deck running the length of the vessel. Large Submarines may have complete decks forward however, going aft, it is normal to have to descend a ladder onto a lower ‘engine room’ deck-level or platform. Some large freighters have a similar construction with internal split deck levels and that is why they are correctly known as boats, although in some cases the term ‘ship’ feels more appropriate because of their large displacement. The argument regarding leaning into or out of a turn is an interesting idea, however this may have more to do with hull and propulsion characteristics than vessel construction. In reality, as with most nautical expressions, whatever feels best to use is probably best and relying on the opinion of a sailor, with regards to an explanation of nautical expressions, puts you at the mercy of a sharp sense of humour.

It might be worth mentioning that some might refer to a ship as “boat” as a diminutive term of endearment, similar to the personification of a car or a pet by assigning the human pronouns to them.

I was once told a SHIP sails the oceans, a BOAT sails on rivers and lakes.

IT SEEMS WE HAVE VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE SEA MEN IN THE HOUSE . BUT I AGREE TOTALLY WITH JEREMY MEYER

It’s always been my info is that a boat can be up to 197’ whereas a ship is over that length. As with anything, I’m sure there are exceptions.

some of the people got it spot on. Tilt away from direction of turn = ship. Tilt towards the direction of turn = boat.

There are two points on every vessel. Center of buoyancy and center of gravity. A ship’s center of gravity is above its center of buoyancy. A boat’s center of gravity is below its center of gravity.

Anyone can answer me why we only know the bareboat charter for any size of the ship? It never mentions bareship charter?

“some of the people got it spot on. Tilt away from direction of turn = ship. Tilt towards the direction of turn = boat. There are two points on every vessel. Center of buoyancy and center of gravity. A ship’s center of gravity is above its center of buoyancy. A boat’s center of gravity is below its center of gravity.”

Except a kayak (or canoe) is like a ship – cg is above cb. If you get a ruddered kayak up to speed and hit the rudder hard it will heel outward like a ship. Since the paddler can easily influence heel, if you want to make a hard turn you heel the ‘boat” outward (to lessen the ends in the water) and sweep stroke on the outward side to spin the “boat”. Is a kayak then a “ship”? Hardly. This is exactly the problem with trying to make one pithy statement to define a ship or boat. It is far more complex than that.

I completely agree with you that the difference between a ship and a boat is the size. One of my friends have a boat, she bought it from Boat Lagoon Yachting. Thanks for sharing!

If you can haul it on the back of truck (even trailered), it’s likely a boat…but if the anchor weighs in like a truck it’s definitely a ship. Obviously, some subs are one or the other regardless of whether you can stuff a (non-inflatable) life boat inside. [Army logic from qualified ex-boat commander, combat support boats, bridge section, Corps of Engineers.]

I grew up near the Welland Canal, and it’s true: vessels which plied the Great Lakes were called “lake boats”, or more commonly, “Lakers”. Oceangoing vessels a were always and reflexively called “ships”..

I am wondering if the naval architect”s comment about internal decks makes the difference, as even a non-engineer can see that a deck extending stem to stern would provide more stability to a vessel’s structure.

The lake boats are always longer than the ocean-going ships, so it’s not size.And we occasionally get a visit from “tall ships”, which are oceangoing sailing vessels, but relatively short.

That’s really informative post. I appreciate your skills, Thanks for sharing.

I will take a shot at this. The word marine is redundant before ship and boat. The word “marine” relates to the sea and one of the conditions of being a ship is that it is ocean going. This does leave the possibility of not being a river boat but a marine boat. I would use the expression sea-going boat.

Marine craft is a useful expression when there is a need to make it cleat that you are not referring an aircraft, space craft etc.

On a general note there are no absolute rules or definition. All we can do is give examples of how the words are used. Companies, governments, navies and anyone else are free to make gheir own definitions but nobody else is bound by them.

I served on the U.S.S. CG-19 ‘THE DZLE & U.S.S. CV-63 KITTY HAWK FOR THE US NAVY in the 80’s. So what about the placement of the helm being center of Bridge on a ship & on starboard side usually on a boat?

With many years of sailing lakes to blue water sailing and large power yachts I can offer this for abot of levity. Afterall,the SeaView had the ‘Flying Sub” flown or driven undersea,on the surface and flown by Captain,Admirals and sadly Polititians and insane quasi research criminals. The Flying Sub also had an inflatable Zodiac,so both could be considered Life saving vessels. Plus,it was really cool!

Can be as difficult as we want. My training was as a NCO (enlisted man in the USN. As others have stated, A ship will lean away from its turn. A boat will lean into the turn. This is naturally due to there the center line of gravity is located. Cargo ships mass above that line. A boat can be loaded onto a ship (lifeboats). Regarding Submarines, they are affectionately referee to , by the crew, as boats and that goes back to WWI /II, the ELB. Electric Boat Div of General Dynamics, located Groton Connecticut .

This design is wicked! You obviously know how to keep a reader entertained. Between your wit and your videos, I was almost moved to start my own blog (well, almost…HaHa!) Fantastic job. I really loved what you had to say, and more than that, how you presented it. Too cool!

More importantly… are they all “She’s” ?

I’ve been wondering about this since I was younger and saw The Hunt for Red October. The COB (Chief of the Boat) was an interesting character, and I wondered by a Sub Chief was called Chief of the Boat, if a sub was a naval ship. Some very interesting and fascinating answers in here! I like the one about how a ship turns, leaning into it or not. That makes sense to me. As for the tiny kayak/canoe exceptions to this, I’d guess that if a human weighs more than the ‘vessel’ and can manipulate it’s attributes of buoyancy or center of gravity whichever, with their own body, then it doesn’t really count as either a boat or a ship. It really has no deck, nor propulsion other than human muscle, no anchor, etc. I don’t see it as much more than a modern design for what used to be termed a ‘raft.’ But I am just spit-balling here, don’t blast me! lol

That’s really nice post. I appreciate your skills. Thanks for sharing.

All the information that you shared with us is very useful for us. Thank you for sharing with us.

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What are boats? Not such a silly question! A ship or a boat (we'll call them all boats from now on) is a vehicle that can float and move on the ocean, a river , or some other watery place, either through its own power or using power from the elements (wind, waves, or Sun). Most boats move partly through and partly above water but some (notably hovercraft and hydrofoils) lift up and speed over it while others ( submarines and submersibles, which are small submarines) go entirely under it. These sound like quite pedantic distinctions, but they turn out to be very important—as we'll see in a moment. Why do boats float? All boats can float, but floating is more complex and confusing than it sounds and it's best discussed through a scientific concept called buoyancy , which is the force that causes floating. Any object will either float or sink in water depending on its density (how much a certain volume of it weighs). If it's more dense than water, it will usually sink; if it's less dense, it will float. It doesn't matter how big or small the object is: a gold ring will sink in water, while a piece of plastic as big as a football field will float. The basic rule is that an object will sink if it weighs more than exactly the same volume of water. But that doesn't really explain why an aircraft carrier (made from dense metal) can float, so let's explore a bit further. Sponsored links (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Positive, negative, and neutral buoyancy Buoyancy is easiest to understand thinking about a submarine . It has diving planes (fins mounted on the side) and ballast tanks that it can fill with water or air to make it rise or fall as it needs to. If its tanks are completely filled with air, it's said to be positively buoyant : the tanks weigh less than an equal volume of water and make the sub float on the surface. If the tanks are partly filled with air, it's possible to make the submarine float at some middle depth of the water without either rising up or sinking down. That's called neutral buoyancy . The other option is to fill the tanks completely with water. In that case, the submarine is negatively buoyant , which means it sinks to the seabed. Find out more about how submarines rise and fall . Photo: Submarines can rise to the surface or sink to any chosen depth by controlling their buoyancy. They do so by letting precise amounts of water or air into their ballast tanks. Photo courtesy of US Navy . Buoyancy on the surface Now most boats don't operate in quite the same way as submarines. They don't sink, but they don't exactly float either. A boat partly floats and partly sinks according to its own weight and how much weight it carries; the greater the total of these two weights, the lower it sits in the water. There's only so much weight a boat can carry without sinking into the water so much that it... does actually sink completely! For ships to sail safely, we need to know how much weight we can put in or on them without getting anywhere near this point. So how can we figure that out? Archimedes' Principle The person who first worked out the answer was Greek mathematician Archimedes, some time in the third century BCE. According to the popular legend, he'd been given the job of finding out whether a crown made for a king was either solid gold or a cheap fake partly made from a mixture of gold and silver. One version of the story says that he was taking a bath and noticed how the water level rose as he immersed his body. He realized that if he dropped a gold crown into a bath, it would push out or "displace" its own volume of water over the side, effectively giving him an easy way to measure the volume of a very complex object. By weighing the crown, he could then easily work out its density (its mass divided by its volume) and compare it with that of gold. If the density was lower than that of gold, the crown was clearly a fake. Other versions of the story tell it a slightly different way—and many people think the whole tale is probably made up anyway! Later, he came up with the famous law of physics now known as Archimedes' Principle: when something is resting in or on water, it feels an upward (buoyant) force equal to the weight of the water that it pushes aside (or displaces). If an object is completely submerged, this buoyant force, pushing upwards, effectively reduces its weight: it seems to weigh less when it's underwater than it does if it were on dry land. That's why something like a rubber diving brick (one of those bricks you train with in a swimming pool) feels lighter when you pick it up from underwater than when you bring it to the surface and lift it through the air: underwater, you're getting a helping hand from the buoyant force. All this explains why the weight of a ship (and its contents) is usually called its displacement : if the ocean were a bowl of water filled right to the brim, a ship's displacement is the weight of water that would spill over the edge when the ship were launched. The USS Enterprise in our top photo has a displacement of about 75,000 tons unloaded or 95,000 tons with a full load, when it sits somewhat lower in the water. Because freshwater is less dense than saltwater, the same ship will sit lower in a river (or an estuary—which has a mixture of freshwater and saltwater) than in the sea. Photo: This relatively small container ship can carry 17,375 tonnes (metric tons) of cargo. The biggest container ships carry over ten times more (around 200,000 tonnes). Photo by Laura A. Moore courtesy of US Navy and archived on Wikimedia Commons . Upthrust Artwork: The weight of a ship pulling down is balanced by upthrust—the pressure of the water underneath, pushing up. Unfortunately, none of this really explains why an aircraft carrier floats! So why does it? Where does that "magic" buoyant force actually come from? An aircraft carrier occupies a huge volume so its weight is spread across a wide area of ocean. Water is a fairly dense liquid that is virtually impossible to compress. Its high density (and therefore heavy weight) means it can exert a lot of pressure: it pushes outward in every direction (something you can easily feel swimming underwater, especially scuba diving). When an aircraft carrier sits on water, partly submerged, the water pressure is balanced in every direction except upward; in other words, there is a net force (called upthrust ) supporting the boat from underneath. The boat sinks into the water, pulled down by its weight and pushed up by the upthrust. How low does it sink? The more it weighs (including the weight it carries), the lower it sinks: If the boat weighs less than the maximum volume of water it could ever push aside (displace), it floats. But it sinks into the water until its weight and the upthrust exactly balance. The more load you add to a boat, the more it weighs, and the further it will have to sink for the upthrust to balance its weight. Why? Because the pressure of water increases with depth: the further into the water the boat sinks, without actually submerging, the more upthrust is created. If the boat keeps on sinking until it disappears, it means it cannot produce enough upthrust. In other words, if the boat weighs more than the total volume of water it can push aside (displaces), it sinks. Upthrust—made simple

How do we know that the upthrust on something is equal to the weight of fluid it displaces.

Photo: The simplest way of understanding why things float is to forget about Archimedes and think instead about density. A ship floats because its average density is relatively small. This empty military transport ship is effectively a giant empty metal box. Divide its total mass (its own mass plus that of its contents) by its volume and you get its average density. That's less than the density of a solid metal box or a metal box filled with water, and that's why the ship floats. Photo by Gary Keen courtesy of US Navy .

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  • Nautical Sayings: Exploring the Fascinating World of Maritime Language

Ahoy there, fellow adventurers of the sea! Whether you're an experienced sailor or just someone fascinated by the world of nautical adventures, you've probably come across some intriguing and often perplexing maritime sayings. In this comprehensive article, we'll dive deep into the ocean of nautical sayings, yacht word origins, boating sayings, and the rich tapestry of nautical slang that has shaped the language of the high seas.

Setting Sail with Nautical Sayings

Ahoy, matey.

Our journey begins with the iconic greeting, "Ahoy, matey!" This classic nautical saying has been immortalized in countless pirate tales and seafaring adventures. But have you ever wondered about its origins and the fascinating history behind it?

The phrase "Ahoy, matey!" finds its roots in the 17th century when pirates and sailors needed a catchy and distinctive way to greet each other on the high seas. We'll explore how this phrase became a symbol of maritime camaraderie and adventure.

Charting the Course of Nautical Language 

Before we delve into specific nautical sayings, let's navigate through the history of maritime language. The sea has always been a source of inspiration for unique expressions, and understanding the evolution of this language is key to appreciating its richness.

Maritime language is a dynamic blend of influences from various cultures, including English, Dutch, and even French. We'll journey through time to uncover how these linguistic influences shaped the nautical lexicon we know today.

Knots and Nautical Expressions 

The maritime world is a treasure trove of fascinating expressions related to knots and ropes. From "tying the knot" to "left in the lurch," we'll unravel the meanings behind these captivating sayings.

Let's explore more nautical phrases related to knots, rigging, and seamanship. Each saying carries a unique history, often reflecting the practical challenges and traditions of sailors.

The Call of the Sea 

Beyond greetings and practical expressions, sailors had a language of their own to communicate effectively on the vast expanse of the ocean. We'll delve into the lesser-known but equally intriguing nautical phrases that were used for signaling, navigation, and coordination.

Discovering Yacht Word Origins

The yacht: a luxurious icon .

Yachts epitomize elegance and luxury on the water. But have you ever wondered where the term "yacht" itself comes from? Let's set sail on a journey through time to explore its origins.

The word "yacht" has a fascinating history that dates back to the early days of sailing. We'll trace its evolution from humble beginnings to the opulent vessels we associate with yachts today.

Yacht or Jacht: A Linguistic Odyssey 

Did you know that "yacht" is closely related to the Dutch word "jacht"? We'll uncover the linguistic connection between these two words and how it has influenced modern yacht culture.

The Dutch influence on yacht design and terminology is profound. We'll delve into how Dutch shipbuilders and explorers played a pivotal role in shaping the yacht industry.

The Golden Age of Yachting 

Yachting isn't just about boats; it's a cultural phenomenon with a rich history. During the 19th century, the "Golden Age of Yachting" saw a surge in yacht building and racing. We'll explore this period and its impact on yacht word origins.

Sailing Through Boating Sayings

Smooth sailing ahead.

When it comes to boating, the saying "smooth sailing" is music to a captain's ears. Join us as we explore the origin of this optimistic phrase and how it reflects the sailors' eternal quest for favorable winds.

"Smooth sailing" isn't just a saying; it embodies the aspirations and experiences of mariners throughout history. We'll recount stories of legendary voyages and the calm seas that inspired this expression.

Weathering the Storm 

Boating isn't always smooth sailing. Sometimes, sailors must "weather the storm." We'll examine the origin of this phrase and its enduring relevance to the maritime world.

Navigating storms at sea has always been a formidable challenge. We'll share tales of courage and resilience that shed light on the origins of this powerful metaphor.

Deciphering Nautical Slang

Aye, aye, captain .

Nautical slang is a language all its own, and "aye, aye, captain" is one of its most recognizable phrases. But what does it really mean, and why is it used so frequently on ships?

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Swabbing the Deck: Nautical Work Lingo 

"Swabbing the deck" might sound like a chore, but it's also a nautical saying with a rich history. We'll uncover its origins and its role in the daily life of sailors.

Navigating Ship Sayings

Shipshape and bristol fashion .

When something is "shipshape and Bristol fashion," it's in excellent condition. Discover the intriguing story behind this phrase, which hails from the bustling port city of Bristol.

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea 

Sometimes, sailors find themselves "between the devil and the deep blue sea." Explore the origins of this saying and the predicaments it describes.

Exploring Boat Phrases

In the same boat .

We often say we're "in the same boat" when facing a common challenge. But where does this saying come from, and why do we use it to express solidarity?

Casting Adrift: Origins of "Adrift" 

Being "adrift" can have a figurative meaning beyond just being at sea. Discover the roots of this saying and how it found its way into everyday language.

Unraveling Nautical Expressions

By and large: a nautical measurement .

The phrase "by and large" has nautical origins tied to sail trimming. Join us as we explore the history of this saying and its transition to everyday language.

Three Sheets to the Wind: A Nautical Reference to Intoxication

Have you ever heard someone described as being "three sheets to the wind"? Learn about the nautical basis of this humorous expression.

Boating Phrases and Sailor Jargon

"know the ropes": mastering the art of sailing.

To "know the ropes" means to be skilled and knowledgeable. We'll sail through the history of this saying and its significance for sailors.

"The Whole Nine Yards": Nautical or Not?

Is "the whole nine yards" a nautical phrase? We'll unravel this linguistic mystery and see if it has nautical origins or not.

Sailing Expressions and Seafaring Terms

"batten down the hatches": preparing for a storm.

When sailors "batten down the hatches," they're preparing for a storm. Discover the practical origins of this vital nautical saying.

"Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea": A Nautical Dilemma 

We revisit the phrase "between the devil and the deep blue sea" to explore its deeper connotations in the context of seafaring.

Nautical Words and Phrases: A Sailor's Lexicon

Nautical sayings: the ultimate lexicon .

Summarizing our exploration, we'll compile a comprehensive list of some of the most intriguing nautical words and phrases that have left their mark on the English language.

As we sail back to the shore of this captivating journey through nautical sayings and maritime language, it's clear that the sea has not only inspired adventurers but also enriched our vocabulary with colorful expressions. From "ahoy, matey" to "the whole nine yards," each saying carries a piece of nautical history that continues to resonate with us today.

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Sailor’s essential guide to AIS: Everything you need to know

Pip Hare

  • November 21, 2019

Pip Hare argues that AIS is one of sailing’s biggest technological developments of the past decade, but what exactly is it and how can sailors use it to their advantage?

ais-for-sailors-essential-guide-credit-marinetrafficcom

Image from the Marine Traffic website shows AIS data concentrated in busy shipping lanes

If I were to pick one development that has revolutionised my own sailing over the past 10 years it would undoubtedly be AIS. Not only has it brought an enhanced level of situational awareness to yachtsmen, but it’s also making huge advances in search and rescue applications. As much as we rely on this system it is sometimes easy to forget its limitations.

A quick recap

AIS uses VHF radio to transmit data gathered from a vessel’s GPS and other navigational sources. Message types are predefined and the number and type of messages received and transmitted depends on the class of AIS fitted.

Class A systems are fitted on all vessels over 300 gross tonnes, all commercial passenger ferries regardless of size and fishing vessels over 15m. Most leisure sailors and smaller vessels choose a Class B system, which transmits a reduced amount of information and can also be receive only.

Article continues below…

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Forward-facing sonar: Everything you need to know

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Who can see you?

Because AIS is transmitted via VHF, its range is limited to ‘line of sight’. Transmissions can be relayed via base stations (and sometimes satellite for Class A), but topography can still be a barrier so if you are under cliffs or large obstructions it’s possible your AIS signal will be masked to vessels in relatively close proximity.

AIS is not compulsory for leisure vessels, or small fishing vessels, so never assume you have the complete picture – especially when coastal sailing. In busy areas, there’s the perennial question of whether some commercial vessels opt to filter out Class B AIS signals. Regardless of whether this is truth or myth; you should never assume you have been seen. If in any doubt take avoiding action early.

Finally, consider whether you always want to be seen. If passage making in waters where broadcasting your position may be a security risk chose a set with ‘silent mode’. In particular remember this feature when at anchor: if using a GPS alarm that’s part of an integrated system your AIS could be forgotten in the background, broadcasting your position to the world.

How we view information

I prefer viewing AIS data on a plotter when in coastal waters, allowing me to make complete navigational decisions. At sea, I’m happy with a course-up display; with no plotter to distract me I can keep my eyes out of the boat.

Don’t let your current system restrict how you view the data; systems can be adapted and linked to additional repeaters and laptops, while developments in NMEA Wi-Fi now allow AIS data to be viewed on mobile apps. If sailing short-handed or with inexperienced crew, audible alarms can also be retrofitted for peace of mind.

Limitations and useful tools

Proximity alarms.

Get into the practice of ‘trimming’ your proximity alarm to fit situations. When setting a range, consider your speed as well as the potential speed of a closing vessel, the experience level of your ‘on watch’ crew, visibility and environment. Get into the habit of checking your proximity alarm setting regularly, especially if you tend to silence it in busy waters when everyone is on deck.

Look beyond the icon

Remember that the icon you see on a screen is your plotter’s interpretation of a situation. Always interrogate the information behind an icon to understand how reliable it is.

Time of last transmission

Class A vessels transmit every 2-10 seconds depending on their speed. Class B vessels are set to a nominal rate of every 30 seconds, however it could be longer depending on speed and the amount of priority traffic in the area (Class B does not have priority transmission).

Some plotters will continue to show ‘echoes’ of vessels for a number of minutes after their last transmission, and these plots in particular can lead to a false confidence in your situation.

Course, trajectory and CPA

The closest point of approach (CPA) is calculated by your own AIS plotter interpolating each burst of information it receives. The CPA is likely to change with every new burst of information. Always back up with radar, if available, and a confirmed visual identification and relative bearing using a hand bearing compass.

In reduced visibility beware that if a Class B vessel is moving at less than 2 knots the nominal reporting rate drops to 3 minutes. This can make calculating a reliable CPA impossible. It’s also worth checking the rate of turn (ROT) data from Class A vessels: if available it can indicate if a vessel is starting to alter course before the plotter calculation.

MMSI identification

One of the most useful features of AIS, this gives a direct line of communication to another vessel and the ability to clarify you have been seen. Although COLREGS are not keen on the use of VHF for collision avoidance, I’ve found that placing a DSC call using the MMSI and opening a dialogue with the bridge of a ship really helps.

Receivers only

Not all AIS receive-only sets are equal. Some receivers are not able to receive Class B vessel name and call sign, while older sets may not be configured for MOB or SART devices.

Search and rescue AIS is now being integrated into personal MOB beacons and as an additional homing signal for EPIRBs . These applications allow any vessel equipped with AIS to join in search operations, greatly increasing the chances of rescue. When using AIS MOB devices ensure you have tested each one against your mothership’s plotter, so all crew are aware of what an MOB symbol looks like.

First published in the May 2018 edition of Yachting World.

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Boat vs. Ship vs Yacht: What’s the Difference?

A couple looking at the sunset as they ride on their sailboat | Sebastus Sailing

Language is a tricky thing, and picking out the differences between similar terms can be confusing. This is especially true when some of the definitions overlap. This is the case with the case of boat vs. ship vs. yacht . What’s the difference? We know in our gut that there are differences between these three seafaring vessels, but unless you’re a harbor master do you really know what counts as what?

Let’s get into some definitions, and we’re going to start with the easiest to explain: What is a yacht? What is a ship? And what is a boat?

Yacht vs. Ship vs. Boat

What is a yacht.

A yacht, I think everyone would agree, is fancier than a ship or a boat. “Yacht” infers some amount of luxury , and definitely recreation. There’s also something to be said about size. A yacht tends to be anywhere between 35 feet up to 160 feet. And some yachts, known as superyachts, go even beyond that. (Jeff Bezos just built a 417 foot yacht, but that’s really breaking yacht records.)

Because of the size, yachts tend to operate in larger bodies of water–generally the ocean. Yachts are able to handle rougher ocean waves, and they are also equipped with more advanced navigation and guidance instruments than smaller boats. Likewise, a yacht tends to have a full crew to help with the navigation, engineering, repairs, as well as having stewards that serve the yacht’s guests. This can be anywhere from a crew of four or five up to a crew of a few dozen on large yachts. 

One interesting thing to note is that outside of the United States, a yacht refers to a sailboat , and a motorized yacht is called a “motor yacht”. 

So, is a yacht a boat? Yes, technically a yacht is a boat. But a yacht is a very specific kind of boat.

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What is a Ship?

The term ship is most commonly associated with a very large boat, and something that is not as fancy as a yacht (one exception is that cruise ships can still be very fancy, but are referred to as ships because of their size and power.)

Ships are generally so large that they would never be found in a lake, with some exceptions for the Great Lakes, and are made for navigating the high seas of the open ocean. An ship can refer to a cruise ship, a naval ship, a tanker, a container ship, and many other commercial vessels.

Ships tend to have advanced navigation and technology, but much more advanced than that of a yacht due to the size, the speed, and the routes that a ship will take. They are meant to be traversing the open ocean for very long periods of time, from one continent to the next, while a yacht may only rarely set across the ocean and most often stays somewhat near land. 

A ship will also have a much larger crew than a yacht or a boat. Ships are typically so large that they need not only one trained navigator but a set of navigators, plus an entire engineering team, and includes many more positions. 

Finally, a ship is meant to carry things. This may be passengers, yes (in reference to cruise ships and some navy ships) but most ships are for carrying cargo–or even carrying equipment to do work on other ships including repair work or refueling. 

What is a Boat?

Well, a boat is harder to define, because a yacht is technically a boat, and a ship is technically a boat. But when people refer to boats, they are almost always referring to something smaller than either a yacht or a ship. Boats may be motorized, like a speed boat, or they may sail, or they may be man-powered, like a rowboat or a kayak. Really, anything up to and including a liferaft, can be called a boat.

(As a side note that will just muddy the waters even further, submarine captains are adamant that their subs are boats. They are not ships.)

motor boat cruising

So, Boat vs. Ship Vs. Yacht?

Ultimately it comes down to this: all three of them are boats, but yachts are fancier, larger, and used for recreation, and ships are even larger, used commercially or by the navy, and are meant to cross oceans. The dividing line is sometimes thin, but generally speaking, when it comes to boats vs. ships.vs. yachts you can go by the adage “ I know it when I see it .”

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43 Ships, Boats, & Yachts From Pop Culture [UPDATED]

Written By: Rob Bowman

"Wherever we want to go, we go. That's what a ship is, you know. It's not just a keel and a hull and a deck and sails; that's what a ship needs. But what a ship is … what the Black Pearl really is … is freedom." — Captain Jack Sparrow

There's something so captivating about a majestic, powerful vessel braving the high seas. There's a vast sense of freedom that's both liberating and terrifying. Many stories are told upon the expanse of the ocean, and the boats, ships, and yachts often become legendary characters themselves. Staten Island Yacht Sales has created a visual treasure trove of some of the most iconic fictional ships collected from movies about ships at sea, TV shows about ships, pirate movies, classic sea adventure movies, and more:

Updated 01/20/2022: Due to popular demand, we updated the infographic to include the S.S. Minnow from Gilligan's Island and The Stugots from The Sopranos.

Click the image to expand

43 Ships, Boats, & Yachts From Pop Culture [UPDATED]

Many of the ships featured in movies are actual seafaring vessels with names. Let’s navigate the origins of some of the most popular fictional ships showcased on this infographic.

What Ship Did They Use for the Black Pearl ?

Is the Black Pearl a real ship? Sadly, no. Many variations of the Black Pearl have been used throughout the films. In the first film, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, the Black Pearl was actually a steel barge with wooden structures extending from it to resemble a real ship. Another one was built on a soundstage in order to achieve optimal control over the fog machines. The moody, enigmatic captain’s quarters were constructed on stages at KABC-TV in Glendale, California.

For Dead Man’s Chest and At World’s End, a more seaworthy Black Pearl was built. It was developed around a ship called the Sunset, which once provided service to oil derricks in the Gulf of Mexico. By building the Black Pearl’s impressive exterior around a functioning ship that could actually navigate on the ocean, it gave producers more creative flexibility and streamlined the filming schedule. After construction was completed at the Steiner Shipyard in Bayou La Batre, Alabama, it sailed 2,000 nautical miles to arrive for the filming of the first scenes at Capucine Point on Dominica.

For Pirates of the Caribbean: On Strange Tides, the Sunset found a new identity. Since the Black Pearl does not figure physically into the storyline of that film, the Sunset was reconstructed to serve as the base for the Queen Anne’s Revenge, the notorious and brutally beautiful ship that struck dread into the hearts of pirates across the high seas.

Is the Black Pearl a real ship? Sadly, no. Many variations of the Black Pearl have been used throughout the films. In the first film, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl , the Black Pearl was actually a steel barge with wooden structures extending from it to resemble a real ship. Another one was built on a soundstage in order to achieve optimal control over the fog machines. The moody, enigmatic captain's quarters were constructed on stages at KABC-TV in Glendale, California.

For Dead Man's Chest and At World's End , a more seaworthy Black Pearl was built. It was developed around a ship called the Sunset, which once provided service to oil derricks in the Gulf of Mexico. By building the Black Pearl 's impressive exterior around a functioning ship that could actually navigate on the ocean, it gave producers more creative flexibility and streamlined the filming schedule. After construction was completed at the Steiner Shipyard in Bayou La Batre, Alabama, it sailed 2,000 nautical miles to arrive for the filming of the first scenes at Capucine Point on Dominica.

For Pirates of the Caribbean: On Strange Tides , the Sunset found a new identity. Since the Black Pearl does not figure physically into the storyline of that film, the Sunset was reconstructed to serve as the base for the Queen Anne's Revenge , the notorious and brutally beautiful ship that struck dread into the hearts of pirates across the high seas.

What Is the Yacht Used in Succession ?

In Succession , the superyacht boarded by the Roy family is known as the Solandge . It's a spectacular 279-foot yacht that was sold for $180 million to an undisclosed buyer in 2017. The superyacht boasts features such as an outdoor cinema and nightclub, helipad, beauty salon, precious gemstone embellishments, and an amethyst and rose quartz chandelier.

What Was the Yacht in Wolf of Wall Street ?

Nadine , the ill-fated yacht in Wolf of Wall Street , was portrayed by the real life 145-foot charter yacht known as Lady M. Did the yacht Nadine really sink? The real-life Nadine did: Shortly after Jordan Belfort procured the lavish vessel which was once owned by Coco Chanel, disaster struck when a raging storm overpowered the Nadine and caused it to sink in 1996.

43 Ships, Boats, & Yachts From Pop Culture

  • Lifeboat, Life of Pi - During a storm, Pi is forced into a lifeboat upon which he meets a peculiar cast of characters as he drifts at sea.
  • Donzi 38ZX 2, Bad Boys II - Camouflaged speedboat used to collect smuggled Ecstasy from a cargo ship.
  • The Riverboat, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory - Infamous for bringing children on a scary, psychedelic boat ride down a chocolate river.
  • The Death Boat, Clash of the Titans - Ferry that delivers souls across the River Styx to the Underworld. It is navigated by Charon, who requires a coin in exchange for passage.
  • Slice of Life, Dexter - Dexter's fishing boat, which he primarily uses to dump victims into the Atlantic.
  • La Quila, Jungle Cruise - Ramshackle steamboat named after the Incan moon goddess, “Quila.” It was often accompanied by pet wildcats such as the jaguar Proxima.
  • Spinacher, Popeye the Sailor Man - Infamous for bringing children on a scary, psychedelic boat ride down a chocolate river.
  • Stealth Ship, Tomorrow Never Dies - Catamaran-style stealth ship that was resistant to radar and sonar, making it nearly undetectable. It was created with the sole intent to provoke conflict between the UK and China.
  • Orca, Jaws - Shark fishing vessel captained by an eccentric war veteran. His ship was hired to catch the rogue shark Bruce.
  • John Rambo's boat, Rambo IV - Longboat used by Rambo to fish and transport people down the Salween River. It is described as a “shit boat” by Burmese pirates.
  • Jenny, Forrest Gump - Shrimping boat named after the love of Forrest Gump's life.
  • Thunderbird 4, Thunderbirds - International Rescue's go-to vehicle for underwater rescue operations.
  • The Aurora, The Adventures of Tintin - Ship used to reach a fallen meteorite during.
  • Argo, Greek mythology - Ship crafted by the gods that Jason and the Argonauts used to sail from Iolcos to Colchis to retrieve the Golden Fleece.
  • S.S. Minnow, Gilligan's Island - Named after Newton Minow, the former chairman of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, who the executive producer of Gilligan's Island believed "ruined television."
  • Going Merry, One Piece - First ship manned by the Straw Hat Pirates. Over time, it became so beloved by the crew that it developed a life of its own.
  • The Henrietta, Around the World in 80 Days - Paddle steamer boarded along the protagonist's attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days.
  • The Stugots, The Sopranos - Boat owned by Tony Soprano. The name of the vessel refers to male genitalia in Italian. In reality, it is a 42-foot fishing yacht.
  • Our Mutual Friend, Lost - Sailboat named after the last novel that Desmond intended to read before he died; birthplace of Penny and Desmond's son.
  • Trimaran, Waterworld - Heavily modified trimaran that is essential for the Mariner to navigate the ocean-covered world.
  • The Inferno, The Goonies - Director Richard Donner kept the construction of the impressive ship a secret from the child actors in The Goonies so he could capture their genuine awe when they first encountered it.
  • The Wanderer, Captain Ron - An old yacht inherited by Martin Harvey from his deceased uncle. It was once owned by famous actor Clark Gable.
  • Andrea Gail, The Perfect Storm - Commercial fishing boat that is caught in a raging hurricane during a late-season fishing expedition.
  • Woodwind II, Wedding Crashers - Sailboat upon which John attempts to impress Claire and her father but fails miserably due to his lack of knowledge.
  • Khetanna, Star Wars - Luxury sail barge engineered by Ubrikkian Industries to suit the needs of crime lord Jabba. It could hold a crew of 26 and 500 passengers.
  • Jolly Roger, Hook - Pirate ship that is Captain Hook's base of operations. It is the only “pirate territory” in Neverland other than Skull Rock.
  • Corsair Ship, Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King - Ship belonging to the Corsairs of Umbar, a corrupted race of Man notorious for their piracy of ships along the coast of Gondor.
  • Pequod, Moby Dick - Nantucket whaling ship named after the Algonquian-speaking Pequot tribe of Native Americans.
  • HMS Surprise, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World - A versatile sailing ship used by Captain Jack Aubrey to intercept Ancheron, a French privateer seeking to plunder British whaling boats.
  • Durmstrang Ship, Harry Potter - Magical ship that could travel underwater, although such an act was a breach of the International Statute of Wizarding Secrecy.
  • Black Pearl, Pirates of the Caribbean - Infamous pirate vessel with distinctive black sails, described as “nigh uncatchable.” It was once named The Wicked Wench, but Captain Sparrow changed the name after it became charred black from being lit ablaze by the governor of the East India Trading Company.
  • Nadine, Wolf of Wall Street - Megayacht that was originally owned by Coco Chanel. It met its demise in a Mediterranean storm at the hands of a drug-addled Belfort.
  • Flying Dutchman, Pirates of the Caribbean - Ghost ship that was originally given the sacred task of gathering all of the poor souls that died at sea and ferrying them to the afterlife.
  • Red Dragon, Rush Hour 2 - Luxury yacht owned by Ricky Tan, a sadistic crime lord.
  • Mediterranean Queen, Murder Mystery - A NYC cop and his hairdresser wife attempt to solve a murder that took place on this megayacht.
  • Solandge, Succession - The Roy family gathers upon this majestic megayacht for a private meeting along with a few Royco executives.
  • The Gertrude, Superman Returns - The original owner and namesake of this superyacht was Gertrude Vanderworth, Lex Luthor's late wife. Its most striking feature was its glass bottom.
  • USS Ardent, The X-Files - American destroyer escort whose crew and passengers became afflicted with a mysterious aging disease.
  • Silence, Game of Thrones - Ironborn longship that served as the flagship of the Iron Fleet. Euron Greyjoy cut out the tongues of his crew after they tied him up to prevent him from jumping overboard during a violent, maddening storm.
  • Bebop, Cowboy Bebop - Fishing trawler originally built to catch and transport Ganymede sea fish. Jet converted it into an interplanetary vessel that serves as transport and residence.
  • SS Anne, Pokemon - Renowned luxury cruise liner that sails around the world, stopping each year in Vermilion City, Kanto.
  • RMS Poseidon, Poseidon - Luxury ocean liner that is intercepted by a massive rogue wave, capsizing it.
  • Ark, 2012 - Series of nine ships that were created to preserve humanity, world history, fine arts, and animals after the Apocalypse. Each Ark could hold over 100,000 people.

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Sailboat with "a bone in her teeth"

40 Sailing Phrases to Know

By: American Sailing American Sailing , Nautical Trivia , Sailing Fun , Sailing History

In 1983, the American Sailing Association was founded by Lenny Shabes. Over the years, hundreds of thousands of sailors have become certified sailors with the ASA sailing curriculum. This year, we celebrate 40 years as the leading sailing education entity in the United States. So when you get out on the water, you can be sure that ASA-certified sailors are sailing safely and confidently.  

Sailors have a way of speaking, and the sport has its own language. Some sailing phrases are common in everyday language, while others are only really used on a sailboat. The ones common in our everyday language have a nautical origin that will make you a more enlightened sailor, as well. The ones used only on a sailboat? Well, the sailing lifestyle lends itself to a specific language to describe situations and offer comedic relief when we are at the mercy of the conditions, and those will make you smarter and more adaptable in real life as well.

With that, we want to offer 40 sailing phrases you should know, some of which you may already be acquainted with.

Enjoy these sailing phrases, and may the best sailor win at nautical trivia night!

  • Batten Down the Hatches – a phrase used to prepare for a storm, or in everyday language, prepare for a difficult upcoming situation.
  • Aye Aye, Captain – a form of ”aye aye, sir”. It literally means “yes, yes” and is used in the military to show that the person who says it will follow an order that has been given and will follow it before doing anything else. It also shows the person knows the order and what it is requiring him or her to do.
  • Fair Winds and Following Seas – a phrase derived from two original sources that has become a nautical blessing used to wish someone good luck on their journey. Fair winds speak to favorable winds that will carry you home, and following seas speak to the direction of the waves generally pushing you in the direction of your heading.
  • Sheet Happens – a humorous phrase used when something goes wrong on a sailing trip. Sheets are the lines that trim sails.
  • Ship-shape and Bristol Fashion – a term used to describe something that is in good order or condition. The word is of nautical origin, based on the obligation of a sailor to keep his or her quarters arranged neatly and securely due to the limited space typically allotted to service members aboard ship, and against turbulence at sea. Bristol fashion refers to the port’s days as a bustling port of trade.
  • All Hands on Deck – During a storm or other crises, the boatswain’s cry of “all hands on deck” signaled the entire crew to handle the sail. These days it is an entreaty or order for everyone to pitch in and help with a problem or reach a goal.
  • Shiver Me Timbers – in everyday language, an exclamation of surprise or excitement. In nautical terms, a reference to the timbers, which are the wooden support frames of a sailing ship. In heavy seas, ships would be lifted up and pounded down so hard as to “shiver” the timbers, startling the sailors.
  • Walk the Plank – Sailors, usually pirates, set a plank that would hang off the ship’s side and made the punished sailors walk to the end and meet their death in the ocean. Today it’s a metaphor for receiving a punishment or facing a situation beyond one’s control.
  • Keel Over – a term used to describe a boat tipping over on its side so far that it capsizes or turns turtle. In every day language, it refers to someone tumbling or falling over.
  • Even Keel – The phrase even keel describes a ship that is level and balanced with its keel perpendicular to the surface of the water. Figuratively it has come to mean a calm, stable state of mind. The opposite is to keel over meaning to capsize.
  • Taken Aback – A ship is pushed backward when violent winds or a careless helmsman cause the sails to blow rearward against the mast. This sudden predicament could snap the mast or severely damage the rigging. As a figure of speech, taken aback means to be astonished by some unwelcome occurrence.
  • Three Sheets to the Wind – a term used to describe someone who is drunk. The sheets are the lines that control the sails on a sailboat. If the lines are not secured — particularly the three which are the two jib sheets and the mainsheet — the sails flop in the wind, and the ship loses headway and control, like a drunk person.
  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea – The “devil” was the topmost plank of the ship’s side closest to the deck. Caulking this long seam in the tight space was a grueling task. One false move and a sailor could find himself plunging into the water. Today someone between the devil and the deep blue sea is in a lousy situation with no good options.
  • Let the Cat Out of the Bag – A whip composed of nine pieces of cord with three knots at the striking end, the cat-o’-nine-tails was one of the authorized instruments of punishment in the British Navy until 1881. It was kept in a cloth bag. A sailor who reported the misdeeds of another let the cat out of the bag.
  • Scuttlebutt – a nautical term for a water dispenser, but also a term used for gossip or rumors on board a ship. A “butt” was a large wooden drinking water cask where sailors gathered around and swapped rumors and stories. On long voyages, water was rationed by carving a hole in the cask’s side so that it could only be half filled. A cask with a hole was “scuttled.” Not much has changed except we now gossip around a water cooler.
  • Anchors Aweigh – a phrase used to describe the moment when an anchor is lifted from the seabed; colloquially it also has come to mean the beginning of a journey.
  • A Bone in Her Teeth – a term used to describe a boat that is moving fast through the water creating a prominent bow wave that looks similar to a dog with a bone in its mouth. Has also come to mean someone who is in a hurry.
  • Tide Over – To tide over was the technique of alternating between sailing and anchoring when battling headwinds and unfavorable tides. This allowed a boat to hold its position until conditions improved. The term now describes enabling someone to get through a difficult period, most commonly by lending money, or with a child, to give a snack to tide them over until dinner.
  • Sailing Close to the Wind – a term used to describe sailing as close to the direction of the wind as possible (any further and you would be in irons and unable to progress). Figuratively, this phrase means to be on the verge of doing something illegal or improper.
  • Cast Off – a term used to describe releasing a mooring line or anchor so a vessel can set sail; in everyday language means to “set free”, for obvious reasons!
  • Dead Reckoning – used in a navigation sense primarily; a method of navigation based on estimating a ship’s position using previous positions and estimated speed and direction of travel
  • Helm’s Alee – a command used when starting to turn the boat through the wind, i.e. tacking. Primarily used on a sailboat, but also an American rock band that started in the early 2000’s in Seattle.
  • Square-rigged, and Squared Away – a term used to describe a ship with square sails. To be squared away, a square-rigged ship had its yards (horizontal bars that held up the sail) positioned at right angles to the deck to best catch the wind. Squared away now means to put things in order or a state of readiness.
  • A Shot Across the Bow – in everyday language, a warning or threat issued to someone. In the 18th century, navies forced oncoming ships to identify themselves by firing a cannon shot over their bow. If the approaching ship hoisted enemy colors an attack might ensue. Traditionally warships had the right to disguise themselves by sailing under neutral or false flags, but once they went into battle they were required to fly their country’s true colors.
  • Crow’s Nest – a platform located high on a mast used as a lookout point. The term is sometimes used metaphorically for the topmost structures in buildings, towers, etc.
  • Jibe Ho – a command spoken when jibing, and the sailboat is heading downwind and across the wind. It is a warning to sit down or be clear of the boom before it swings!
  • Lower the Boom – The boom is the long horizontal pole that controls the movement of the mainsail. It can deliver sailors a knockout blow if it swings wildly or collapses in heavy weather. These days the phrase means to put a stop to, chastise, or rebuke.
  • Headwinds – winds blowing in the opposite direction of the ship’s movement; has also come to mean resistance or opposition to a plan, often referred to as “economic headwinds” in business.
  • Sea Legs – the ability to adjust to the motion of a ship and maintain balance; To “have one’s sea legs” is to be able to walk calmly and steadily on a tossing ship, or to become accustomed to a new or strange situation
  • Run Aground; or High and Dry – to be run aground is when the bottom of the boat hits the sea floor and stops the boat. For a ship to run aground in a receding tide is to be left high and dry. Getting stuck with the check when everyone else has taken off is also to be left high and dry.
  • Dead in the Water – when there is no wind and the water is completely still, giving no chance of any sailing. The phrase also means a proposal or plan with zero chance of success.
  • Fathom – a unit of measurement for depth, equal to six feet. This nautical unit of measurement is based on the span of a man’s outstretched arms. The word comes from the Old English “faedem,” to embrace. Sailors measured ocean depths, anchor chains, ropes, and cables in fathoms. Although marines eventually abandoned fathoms for meters, we onshore still reach for the word fathom to express our ability to comprehend, grasp, or get to the bottom of things.
  • Gunwale – the upper edge of the side of a boat, pronounced “gunnel”, named for where the guns on a ship would sit. To be “full to the gunnels” means to be completely full.
  • In Irons – A sailing vessel is “in irons” when she is trapped in the “No Go Zone”, unable to bear away and begin sailing. The term dates from when criminals aboard old sailing ships were secured to the deck with leg-irons, unable to move.
  • Kedge – a smaller anchor used to move the ship slowly in a desired direction. Used primarily in nautical situations, but can be adapted to mean a clever way of moving in a direction when the obvious method won’t work.
  • The Cut of One’s Jib – “Jib” is the name of the foresail that controls the general performance of a ship. In everyday life, it also means the way one looks or conducts themselves (usually negative).
  • Cup of Joe – The days of rum, beer, and officers’ personal wine supply dried up with the appointment of Josephus Daniels as Secretary of the Navy. In 1914 this stern Methodist and prohibitionist banned “…the use or introduction for drinking purposes of alcoholic liquors on board any naval vessel, or within any navy yard or station.” As a substitute, stewards increased orders for coffee. Naval lore has it that the disgruntled sailors tagged the poor substitute “cup of Josephus Daniels,” and later the shorter “cup of Joe.” That’s one theory, anyway, but one thing we know — any day, aboard a ship or not, deserves its properly caffeinated start!
  • Groundswell – Deep ocean waves grow larger as they move over uneven seabeds and are felt as surface undulations. Colloquially, the term describes a widespread surge of public opinion.
  • It’s an Ill Wind that Blows No Good – While a sailor could be frustrated by an unfavorable wind, it might be a great wind for a sailor going another direction. This translates into everyday life to mean that what’s bad for one person may be good for another.
  • Know the Ropes – Old, tall ships had miles of rigging. Today’s sailboats also have quite a lot of line. Each serves a purpose, and it’s critical for sailors to correctly identify each one. Securing or unlashing the wrong line at the wrong time could be catastrophic, or at least cause you to lose the regatta. In sailing and in real life, to be well versed and familiar is to know the ropes.

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Cambridge Dictionary

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Meaning of boat in English

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  • The boat was swept out to sea by the tide .
  • The boat sank almost immediately after it had struck the rock .
  • The lifeboat rescued the sailors from the sinking boat.
  • The fishing boats were out at sea for three days .
  • In the harbour , the boats bobbed gently up and down on the water .
  • cabin cruiser
  • dragon boat
  • rubber dinghy

You can also find related words, phrases, and synonyms in the topics:

boat | American Dictionary

Examples of boat, collocations with boat.

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Translations of boat

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Applying Boat Lettering

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Here are two easy methods to apply vinyl lettering or graphics to your boat.

One of the best parts of getting a new (to you) boat is choosing the name and putting it on the boat to make it yours. The following methods will make it easy to apply Do-It-Yourself vinyl lettering. The "wet" method is best for larger graphics or longer names, such as those that might go on a transom. Generally, if the distance from the center of the lettering to the edge is longer than your arm, you'll want to use the wet method, and probably want a second set of hands to help you. The "dry" method works great for smaller names, ports of call, and registration numbers.

For both methods you will need a ruler or tape measure, masking tape, glass cleaner and paper towels, a pin or razor, plus the squeegee that comes with the graphics. For the wet method, you will also need a spray bottle filled with three drops of dish soap in two cups of water. For the dry method you'll need a pair of scissors.

You'll have better luck with the wet method if the outside temperature is between 65 and 85 degrees. With the dry method, it can be as low as 45 degrees out. With both methods the first step is to clean off the area where the lettering is going to go by spraying it down with glass cleaner and wiping the area dry with a paper towel. Now you're ready to begin.

The Wet Method

1. Apply two pieces of masking tape to the edges of the graphic. Then place the graphic on the clean transom or boat side where it will be applied. Measure the graphic using the bottom of the first and last letter on the same plane.

2.  Once the graphic is in the location you want, mark the corners in masking tape.

3.  After you have marked the area, remove the graphic from the boat and spread the graphic on a smooth, clean surface with the paper side up.

4.  After removing the backing paper, spray the sticky side of the graphic and transfer tape with the soap and water solution. Wet the entire area thoroughly.

5.  Once you have sprayed the graphic, spray the transom or side of the boat where the graphic will be applied. The soap and water solution allows you to slide the graphics around for proper placement, so don't be shy with the spraying.

6.  Place the graphic in the desired location. As long as both the graphic and the boat are wet, the letters can be slid into position.

7.  When the graphics are in position, squeegee the letters to push the air and water out from under the vinyl.

8.  The graphic will need at least an hour to dry in place after you finish squeegee-ing. High humidity will increase drying time.

9.  After the graphic has dried, remove the transfer tape by pulling it back from the corners and over itself. Do not pull away from the boat as this could lift the lettering. If you find any air bubbles, prick them with a pin or razor blade and push the air out with your fingernail.

Download a PDF copy of the Wet Installation Steps.

The Dry Method

1.  Apply two pieces of masking tape to the edges of the graphic. Then place the graphic on the clean transom or boat side where it will be applied. Measure the graphic using the bottom of the first and last letter on the same plane.

2.  Once the graphic is in the location you want, run a piece of masking tape vertically down the center of the lettering to hold it in place.

3.  Lift one side of the lettering from the boat, and pull the paper backing off up to the center line of the masking tape.

4.  Using scissors, cut the backing paper away from the lettering at the center line.

5.  Once the backing paper is removed, pull lightly on the lettering and squeegee outward from the centerline. Be careful to use an even pull to keep it straight. Press firmly with the squeegee to remove any air bubbles trapped under the lettering.

6.  Remove the center line tape and the rest of the backing paper on the other side of the lettering.

7.  Squeegee outwards from the center as you did in Step Five.

8.  Once the lettering is applied, squeegee the entire graphic with hard pressure to attach it to the boat.

9.  Remove the transfer tape by pulling it back over itself. Do not pull away from the boat as this can lift the graphics.

10.  Pop any trapped air bubbles with a pin or razor blade and push the air out with your fingernails. You're done. 

Download a PDF copy of the Dry Installation Steps.

Rear (stern) of a white boat with the boats name in very large print and the city and state listed just below it

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Welcome to the textart.sh collection of ship text art! You can copy and paste these art pieces using the buttons below each piece.

Don't forget to click the spaces→underscores button to fill the white space with underscore characters so that when you paste it somewhere, it doesn't collapse all the spaces.

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How long will feckless Joe Biden ignore the grave threat of sharks and electric boats?

Does biden even care about patriotic americans like us, the ones who might one day be forced to choose between boat-battery electrocution or death by shark.

text a ships boats and yachts

Thank God for MY PRESIDENT, Donald J. Trump, the one presidential candidate with courage enough to confront the greatest twin threats of our time: sharks and electric boat batteries.

At a recent rally, Trump brought up the dilemma that’s keeping so many Americans who ride through shark-infested waters in battery-powered boats awake at night: “What would happen if the boat sank from its weight, and you’re in the boat and you have this tremendously powerful battery, and the battery is now underwater and there’s a shark that’s approximately 10 yards over there ?”

It’s truly every electric-boat-using parent’s worst nightmare, assuming they don’t understand how boat batteries work and don't question why the shark that’s 10 yards over there wouldn’t also be getting electrocuted.

“Do I get electrocuted if the boat is sinking, water goes over the battery, the boat is sinking?” Trump smartly asked . “Do I stay on top of the boat and get electrocuted, or do I jump over by the shark and not get electrocuted?”

Unlike Trump, Biden doesn't care if you get eaten by a shark

These are not the kind of sensible, America-loving questions you hear from Sleepy Joe Biden. Does he even care about patriotic Americans like us, the ones who might one day be forced to choose between boat-battery electrocution or death by shark?

I doubt he cares at all. He’s too busy being both dementia-addled AND the devious mastermind of a global crime family while also turning our country into a banana republic by allowing the justice system to use a "jury" to find Trump “guilty” of “crimes.”

Obviously Trump is Jesus: Marjorie Taylor Greene compares Trump to Jesus. Which Bible is she reading?

No, you won’t hear one word from Biden about sharks or large boat batteries.

He’s either too busy being totally out of it due to severe mental decline OR carefully plotting an elaborate scheme to get his son convicted on federal gun charges so people think that the justice system is legitimate and that Trump’s recent 34-count conviction on New York felony charges wasn’t actually rigged.

NICE TRY, SLEEPY JOE!

Maybe for a change you could give a damn about the American people by making sure they aren’t dying of ocean electrocution or in the razor-toothed mouths of presumably electrocution-proof sharks!

Trump will surely protect us from battery electrocution and sharks

At the same rally where Trump addressed our nation’s shark/battery crisis – a speech many are saying was as good as, if not better than, President John F. Kennedy’s 1961 inaugural address – the man who made MAGA noted : “By the way, a lot of shark attacks lately, do you notice that? A lot of sharks. I watched some guys justifying it today. ‘Well, they weren’t really that angry, they bit off the young lady’s leg because of the fact that they were not hungry but they misunderstood who she was.’ These people are crazy. He said there’s no problem with sharks they just didn’t really understand a young woman swimming now who really got decimated and a lot of other people too, a lot of shark attacks.”

Indeed. All these shark attacks , combined with what I assume are innumerable instances of battery-powered boats sinking near sharks, have created a national catastrophe Biden is choosing to ignore.

Questions abound when it comes to sinking electric-powered boats

There are so many questions. Why are the boats sinking, and why, as Trump mentioned, is there always a shark “approximately 10 yards” away?

Are these sharks working for the Democratic National Committee? Is the Biden Crime Family having communist China manufacture the boats that keep sinking under the weight of these batteries?

Hunter Biden convicted: Hunter Biden guilty verdict proves Trump's trial wasn't 'rigged'

And why does the electrical current stop mattering if the person jumps over by the shark?

Wouldn’t the boater who leaps overboard get both electrocuted AND eaten by the shark that, for some reason, is wholly unfazed by any electric current?

Another Biden term means certain death for electric-boat owners

And why have we never heard of the presumably thousands of people who are being electrocuted by boat batteries? Is this a cover-up by the fake news media?

With shark-lover Biden in office, we’ll surely never know. And unless Trump gets elected this fall, more and more Americans will have to answer the impossible question posed by the man we Republicans think should be leader of the free world: “Do I stay on top of the boat and get electrocuted, or do I jump over by the shark and not get electrocuted?”

Vote accordingly, folks. Otherwise, the sharks and the batteries win.

Follow USA TODAY columnist Rex Huppke on X, formerly Twitter,  @RexHuppke  and Facebook  facebook.com/RexIsAJerk .

Opinion Is Donald Trump okay?

His story about hypothetically being electrocuted is another glimpse into a mind that is unwell.

text a ships boats and yachts

It is irresponsible to obsess over President Biden’s tendency to mangle a couple of words in a speech while Donald Trump is out there sounding detached from reality. Biden, who is old , at least makes sense. Trump, who also is old , rants like someone you’d cross the street to avoid.

We in the media have failed by becoming inured to Trump’s verbal incontinence — not just the rapid-fire lies and revenge-seeking threats, but also the frightening glimpses into a mind that is, evidently, unwell. In 2016, Trump said outrageous things at his campaign rallies to be entertaining. In 2024, his tangents raise serious questions about his mental fitness.

His rally on Sunday in Las Vegas offered a grim smorgasbord of examples, but the obvious standout (and not in a good way) is the story he told about being aboard a hypothetical electric-powered boat . He posits that the battery would be so heavy that it would cause the craft to sink, and he relates his purported conversation with a knowledgeable mariner about this scenario. Bear with me, but it’s worth reading the passage in full:

“I say, ‘What would happen if the boat sank from its weight, and you’re in the boat, and you have this tremendously powerful battery, and the battery’s now underwater, and there’s a shark that’s approximately 10 yards over there?’ “By the way, a lot of shark attacks lately, do you notice that? Lot of sharks. I watched some guys justifying it today: ‘Well they weren’t really that angry, they bit off the young lady’s leg because of the fact that they were not hungry but they misunderstood who she was.’ These people are crazy. He said, ‘There’s no problem with sharks, they just didn’t really understand a young woman swimming.’ No, really got decimated, and other people, too, a lot of shark attacks. “So I said, ‘There’s a shark 10 yards away from the boat, 10 yards, or here. Do I get electrocuted if the boat is sinking, water goes over the battery, the boat is sinking? Do I stay on top of the boat and get electrocuted, or do I jump over by the shark and not get electrocuted?’ Because I will tell you, he didn’t know the answer. “He said, ‘You know, nobody’s ever asked me that question.’ I said, ‘I think it’s a good question. I think there’s a lot of electric current coming through that water.’ But you know what I’d do if there was a shark or you get electrocuted? I’ll take electrocution every single time. I’m not getting near the shark. So we’re going to end that, we’re going to end it for boats, we’re going to end it for trucks.”

Trucks? He’s actually talking about the transition to electric vehicles , which he has vowed to halt. That entire hallucination is part of Trump’s rationale for one of his major policy positions.

Trump has told the electrocution-or-shark story at least once before , at a rally in Iowa last October. Stormy Daniels , the adult-film actress who received $130,000 in hush money to keep quiet about her sexual encounter with Trump — a payment that led to the former president’s conviction on 34 felony charges — has said that Trump is “obsessed with sharks, terrified of sharks.” Way back in 2013, he declared on Twitter: “Sharks are last on my list — other than perhaps the losers and haters of the World!”

The White House press corps would be in wolf pack mode if Biden were in the middle of a speech and suddenly veered into gibberish about boats and sharks. There would be front-page stories questioning whether the president, at 81, was suffering from dementia; and the op-ed pages would be filled with thumb-suckers about whether Vice President Harris and the Cabinet should invoke the 25th Amendment . House Republicans would already have scheduled hearings on Biden’s mental condition and demanded he take a cognitive test.

The tendency with Trump, at 77, is to say he’s “just being Trump.” But he’s like this all the time.

Also during the Las Vegas speech, Trump tried to deny the allegation by one of his White House chiefs of staff, retired Marine Gen. John F. Kelly, that he refused in 2018 to visit an American military cemetery in France, saying it was filled with “suckers” and “losers.” Trump told the crowd on Sunday that “only a psycho or a crazy person or a very stupid person” would say such a thing while “I’m standing there with generals and military people in a cemetery.”

But he wasn’t “standing there” with anybody. He never went to the cemetery .

Except in his mind, perhaps, which is a much bigger problem than Biden fumbling a name or garbling a sentence.

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Kerala’s Champakkulam Boat Race 2024 to begin from June; interesting facts

Times of India TIMESOFINDIA.COM / Created : Jun 13, 2024, 20:00 IST

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Champakkulam in Kerala hosts the oldest Snake Boat Race, a key cultural event attracting visitors. The festival marks the start of boat race season in June, featuring traditional Snake Boats and cultural celebrations.

Champakkulam in Kerala hosts the oldest Snake Boat Race, a key cultural event attracting visitors. The festival marks the start of boat race season in June, featuring traditional Snake Boats and cultural celebrations. Read less

Kerala’s Champakkulam Boat Race 2024 to begin from June; interesting facts

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Kerala’s Champakkulam Boat Race 2024 to begin from June; interesting facts

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Kerala’s Champakkulam Boat Race 2024 to begin from June; interesting facts

Champakkulam in Kerala hosts the oldest Snake Boat Race, a key cultural event attracting visitors. The festival marks the start of boat race season in June, featuring traditional Snake Boats and cultu...

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Trump Takes His Hatred Of Sharks To Bizarre New Level In Wild Rally Rant

Ed Mazza

Overnight Editor, HuffPost

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Two of Donald Trump ’s signature dislikes met head-on during a rally in Las Vegas on Sunday as the former president railed against both renewable energy and sharks in a wild rant.

Trump, who has frequently attacked electric vehicles, on Sunday complained that electric boats are so heavy they are prone to sinking ― but went off on several tangents as he spoke, including one about sharks.

Then, he wondered if it was better to be on a sinking electric boat or in the water with a shark.

“Do I get electrocuted if the boat is sinking, water goes over the battery, the boat is sinking, do I stay on top of the boat and get electrocuted, or do I jump over by the shark and not get electrocuted?” he asked.

Trump was clear on which he would choose.

“I’ll take electrocution every single time,” he said. “I’m not getting near the shark.”

Trump: It must be because of my relationship with M.I.T., very smart, I say, what would happen if the boat sank, and you have this tremendously powerful battery, and the battery is now underwater…. Do I get electrocuted or do I jump over by the shark? pic.twitter.com/zAUkDoOBD3 — Acyn (@Acyn) June 9, 2024

Trump went off on a similar tangent last year.

Any risk of electrocution is not exclusive to electric boats. Many gas-powered watercraft have batteries to power appliances on board, leading to injuries and deaths from electric shock drowning ― a danger that has existed since well before electric-powered boats.

The Boat Owners Association of The United States says these incidents are “often the result of faulty wiring and equipment on boats or docks.”

However, Trump has frequently attacked most sources of renewable energy, including electric boats, electric cars and windmills .

He’s also not a fan of sharks.

Porn star Stormy Daniels, who claims to have had an affair with Trump which the former president denies, told In Touch Weekly in 2011 that he’s “obsessed” with sharks.

“Terrified of sharks,” she said. “He was like, ‘I donate to all these charities and I would never donate to any charity that helps sharks. I hope all the sharks die.’”

Trump has ― indirectly ― confirmed Daniels’ claim.

“I’m not a big fan of sharks,” he said in 2020 . “I have people calling me up, ‘Sir, we have a fund to save the shark, it’s called Save The Shark.’ I say, ‘No, thank you, I have other things I can contribute to.’”

Trump’s critics on social media were baffled by the strange rant:

This is like listening to your senile uncle at the dinner table after he has that third drink. https://t.co/lLEnQ8vXWn — Stephen King (@StephenKing) June 9, 2024
If this 90 seconds was during a Biden speech Fox would spend the next month on it declaring his mind is gone. https://t.co/kBCgq1Tgra — Justin Kanew (@Kanew) June 9, 2024
Questions: 1) Who's selling (dumb) people boats that sink due to weight? 2) Gas powered boats also have batteries, why isn't there an epidemic of electrocuted boaters? 3) Wouldn't the shark get electrocuted, too? 4) Timecode :41???? 5) The MIT friend is made up, right? https://t.co/XiuQf1P12C — Bob Cesca (@bobcesca_go) June 9, 2024
Really just a raving lunatic at this point. A cash-strapped avatar for dummies. A felonious stupidity magnet. https://t.co/WUNseCsQ93 — Rex Huppke (@RexHuppke) June 9, 2024
my kingdom to whoever finds me this strain of edible https://t.co/Hrntc7HV5D — nikki mccann ramírez (@NikkiMcR) June 10, 2024
It’s tough for any Trump cognitive decline to stand out because his depth of knowledge on any topic has always been subterranean, but also indistinguishable from 99% of Republican thought leaders. I don’t know if he has dementia. I do know he’s an intellectual titan in the GOP. https://t.co/8Q6zr3Brgi — Joe Rossi (@JoeLATrib) June 9, 2024
Some candidates go to Nevada and make promises they can’t keep about Yucca Mountain. Others go to the middle of the desert and warn of shark attacks. https://t.co/7MEtWVpDoc — Sasha Issenberg (@sissenberg) June 10, 2024
President. This man was president. Some of y'all want to make him so again. And I'm just over here trying to figure out what the heck I'm living through. https://t.co/jUDEc2KLiR — Jennifer Erin Valent (@JenniferEValent) June 9, 2024
Captain Queeg would call this too weird https://t.co/QCRWx2EscF — Gregg Easterbrook (@EasterbrookG) June 9, 2024
It's completely fine to say "I prefer Trump's policies over Biden's." We can argue the nuances of that, but it at least makes some sense as an argument. But seriously, we have to stop saying "Biden is losing his cognitive abilities, but Trump isn't." It's just not accurate. https://t.co/cnWVQGe8nQ — ross king (@rosskingmusic) June 9, 2024
But, but, but...Biden is OLD... https://t.co/cQz6difBVm — Tim Wise (@timjacobwise) June 9, 2024
If Joe Biden ever said some stupid shit like this, it would be breaking news for weeks, but Trump says it, and we treat it just like any other day. https://t.co/rU7g0Yt1gz — Alex Cole (@acnewsitics) June 9, 2024

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Philippines demands China return rifles and pay for boat damage after hostilities in disputed sea

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By JIM GOMEZ Associated Press

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippine military chief has demanded China return several rifles and equipment seized by the Chinese coast guard in a disputed shoal and pay for damage in an assault he likened to an act of piracy in the South China Sea. Chinese personnel on more than eight motorboats repeatedly rammed then boarded the two navy inflatable boats Monday. They wanted to prevent Filipino navy personnel from transferring food and other supplies including firearms to a Philippine territorial outpost in Second Thomas Shoal, which is also claimed by Beijing.

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