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J44 vs J130

  • Thread starter phrfwanker
  • Start date Nov 29, 2009

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  • Nov 29, 2009

So, collectively there must be some opinions on these two boats, lets hear em What would you pick? is one better than the other in different conditions?  

Grinder

Super Anarchist

You are such a phrfwanker  

podrick

Just go the J133  

burnsed

Sailed on both of them raced against both of them over the years. Go the 44, it's a timeless boat.  

v-max

burnsed said: Sailed on both of them raced against both of them over the years. Go the 44, it's a timeless boat. Click to expand...

2high2tight

J44. but I still hate running backs.  

Snarley

For IRC the old J44 is a weapon. J130 is not. Check out Key West IRC and San Francisco Big Boat results. I think there is a shoal draft option on the J44. Not sure how that affects IRC. Also the J44 has the concern of Balsa core on an older Jboat. Might be fine...might not.  

InNeedOfSomeRestraint

How large is your steady crew?  

MacGregor_Lover

MacGregor_Lover

  • Nov 30, 2009

Where are you located? If Northeast you have OD with the 44. Way better than a j130. Lots of sandwiches and beer though  

The 130 looks like J-boats averaged the hull shape of the 44 and the 120, almost right in the middle of the 2. I sailed many years on a 44, it's a good boat. I've done a number of races on a J-120, including distance races, it's also a good boat. The drawbacks of the 44- crew intensive, especially for competitive round the buoys races. You need 11 good folks to sail it well when the breeze is up. You could probably sail the 130 with 8. Getting 11 folks out on a consistent basis can be a real hassle. 8 much less so. There are some one-design races with the 44 though that are great sailing.  

dacapo

I believe the J130 was meant more for long term cruising with a short handed crew.............  

Raced on a J130 PHRF out of Dana Point for a couple years (coincidentally the one listed on SA right now). Main impression is that its a freight train that can sail upwind quite nicely, but definitely needs the breeze to get rolling. Plenty of sail area, the biggest kite is around 2200+ sq ft. We would get beat up by the Hendos on light days, but when the wind kicked up we could out pace them, sweet spot for wind range is 8-15knts. The boat is definitely good for long term cruising, the boat would revert back to cruising mode after every regatta. I don't think there are too many around since it was produced during a recession.  

peetoleeward

waterboy said: The 130 looks like J-boats averaged the hull shape of the 44 and the 120, almost right in the middle of the 2.I sailed many years on a 44, it's a good boat. I've done a number of races on a J-120, including distance races, it's also a good boat. The drawbacks of the 44- crew intensive, especially for competitive round the buoys races. You need 11 good folks to sail it well when the breeze is up. You could probably sail the 130 with 8. Getting 11 folks out on a consistent basis can be a real hassle. 8 much less so. There are some one-design races with the 44 though that are great sailing. Click to expand...

Dark & Stupid

Dark & Stupid

Pai said: Raced on a J130 PHRF out of Dana Point for a couple years (coincidentally the one listed on SA right now). Main impression is that its a freight train that can sail upwind quite nicely, but definitely needs the breeze to get rolling. Click to expand...

SailRacer

How much do you want to spend? I know of a J44 program on WLIS that runs the owner about 1k per weekend for racing (with OD sails for the fleet that keep the cost(s) ~ down). Please do not quote me as this is what I understand the owner told me. please note: this ride does NOT include foul WX gear etc, etc. and getting beat up by Challange, Digger etc.... who have had thes boats for "generations". for IRC distance racing it is a sound boat that is comfortable in formidable WX. IMHO Sail safe!  

Like PAI - I've spent a lot of time on a J/130. I agree that they need lots of breeze to do well. It's a freight-train in 25knt and big seas, up and down wind. It's paaaaaaainful in less than 7-8knts, both up and down. It's a great ocean boat, but not so good around the buoys in our experience. We sail it often with 8 or less (7 to Hawaii). I hate to say it because I'm a racer at heart, but the boat is more of a cruiser/racer vs a racer/cruiser. It's an awesome family cruiser. Haven't spent any time on a J/44.  

I sailed a lot on a J/44. They are big heavy boats that need a decent crew to go around the buoys. They generally get a decent turnout to race OD in many events. The fellow who runs the class is great and the parties they have are excellent.  

artie_pitt

RandyNJ said: I sailed a lot on a J/44. They are big heavy boats that need a decent crew to go around the buoys. They generally get a decent turnout to race OD in many events. The fellow who runs the class is great and the parties they have are excellent. Click to expand...

jurrasicsailor

jurrasicsailor

If your goal is to win ocean races, buy a Cal 40 - has won more than any other design, and continues to do so. In light air you can get by with 4, in heavy air you'll want 6 or more. At 16k displacement, far less costly to own and maintain a competitive sail inventory than the two you mention. West Coast has active one design, and someday soon East Coast too. (we are up to 3 here at TAYC!). Your significant other will not think it is a chlorox bottle, and you have the option of doing the Good Old Boat Series!  

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Spartan but reasonable cruising accommodations

j130 sailboat reviews

J/130 anchored in Bahia de los Muertos

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  • Sailboat Guide

J/130 is a 42 ′ 8 ″ / 13 m monohull sailboat designed by Rod Johnstone and built by J Boats between 1994 and 2002.

Drawing of J/130

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

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J/130 Detailed Review

https://images.harbormoor.com/originals/31a5f612-b825-4886-b44f-6e0ee3dcd51c

If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of J/130. Built by J Boats and designed by Rod Johnstone, the boat was first built in 1994. It has a hull type of Fin w/bulb & spade rudder and LOA is 13.01. Its sail area/displacement ratio 25.21. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by Yanmar, runs on Diesel.

J/130 has retained its value as a result of superior building, a solid reputation, and a devoted owner base. Read on to find out more about J/130 and decide if it is a fit for your boating needs.

Boat Information

Boat specifications, sail boat calculation, rig and sail specs, auxillary power tank, accomodations, contributions, who designed the j/130.

J/130 was designed by Rod Johnstone.

Who builds J/130?

J/130 is built by J Boats.

When was J/130 first built?

J/130 was first built in 1994.

How long is J/130?

J/130 is 11.64 m in length.

What is mast height on J/130?

J/130 has a mast height of 16 m.

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Sailboat specifications

  • Last update: 10th April 2020

J/130's main features

J/130's main dimensions, j/130's rig and sails, j/130's performances, j/130's auxiliary engine, j/130's accommodations and layout.

J/Boats J/130  Picture extracted from the commercial documentation © J/Boats

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  • By Bill Lee And Sheila Mccurdy
  • Updated: October 31, 2001

j130 sailboat reviews

We motored away from the dock in Newport on a calm pretty morning. The GPS agreed with the speedometer — flat out we were doing a respectable 8.6 knots on this 40-footer powered by a 38-horsepower Yanmar driving a Martec two-blade folding propeller. Optimal cruising speed would be a little less.

Under Sail We headed for a light breeze and hoisted the long-battened mainsail on Harken slide cars with ease. The boat was responsive and maneuverable under main alone and came alive when we unfurled the jib. This J/120 was equipped with an optional carbon mast by Hall Spars. The reduced weight aloft made possible by a carbon spar increases the range of positive stability as well as performance overall. The mast is stepped through the deck for extra stiffness in the rig and better control of sail shape.

Off the wind, the boat sailed very well under the asymmetrical spinnaker. Once essential line attachments were made on the foredeck and the spinnaker pulled out of the forward hatch, all spinnaker operations, including using the snuffer, were possible from the cockpit. In light air the 120 moves fast enough to bring the apparent breeze well forward and thus, even with this sail tacked out on the extended seven-foot sprit, one needs to think like a catamaran sailor and tack downwind.

The boat we sailed had the standard seven-foot lead keel; a 5’9″ shoal-draft keel is offered optionally. Both keels are narrow fins with an elephant-foot style bulb on the bottom for good stability and lift.

The Cockpit The cockpit is very comfortable with well positioned foot bracing for the crew when the boat is heeled. The double-ended mainsheet has Harken 44 self-tailing winches on each side of the cockpit reached easily by either the helmsman or the crew — as is the traveler. All halyards and reef lines lead aft on the cabin house and all winch handles clear the dodger comfortably. The 48-inch-diameter lightweight Edson aluminum wheel permits the helmsman to get well outboard on either side for maximum visibility. The helmsman seating is comfortable both when level or heeled. All of this provides a good balance between shorthanded and crewed sailing.

The Interior Below, the ladder had a generous 60-degree slope and side rails kept one’s feet from sliding off when heeled. The interior was light and airy with double staterooms fore and aft. No Dorades were provided; however, the cabin ports opened. Both double berths were a little on the small side and the inboard end of the J sprit did occupy a portion of the forward stateroom; however, given the interiors of most 40-foot race boats, this cruiser/racer had very nice accommodations. The two main cabin settees were long and straight, and could easily function as sea berths with lee cloths in place. While the galley is compact, it is very adequate and the six-cubic-foot icebox is bigger than on many boats. An Origo non-pressurized alcohol stove with oven is standard. The stove gimballed well and was equipped with a protection bar.

Construction The hull and deck are fiberglass with balsa core and the boat is built to ABS-approved plans. The boat is laminated using the resin-infusion process, which gives superior quality over conventional production layup techniques. The hull-to-deck flange joint is extra wide at 4.5 inches, and it is glued using a urethane elastomer adhesive. While strength is gained wherever rail hardware is bolted through and where bulkheads are attached, the glue does most of the job. The lack of mechanical purchase in this hull-to-deck joint may make some nervous, but for reassurance one only need consider that most of the boat — in fact most of any FRP boat — is held together by various types of resin and glue in the first place. The new series of “J sprit” boats represents an excellent balance between cruising boats you can race and racing boats you can cruise coastally. Certainly, the boat can be made even faster by removing the lazy jacks, replacing the jib furler with a foil and adding a conventional spinnaker for square running. But that’s not the point. The point is to create a shorthanded cruising boat that can perform, and J/Boats has done a superb job. — Bill Lee

To cruising sailors who seek out new models at boat shows, the J/120 is something of a quiet dove among pouter pigeons — built more for flying than roosting. There are no button-tufted armchairs, vanities or mood lighting. There are powerful and easily managed sails, a responsive helm, a light but well-built hull and efficient maintainability throughout.

At the dock, the lack of frills gives the boat a Spartan or simplistic appearance, but a sailor’s appreciation builds immediately when under way. Almost invisible details make the boat a pleasure to be aboard. The cockpit is configured for convenience of steering and sail handling. The big wheel and semi-balanced rudder create a fingertip helm, and when I nudged it less than a half turn to leeward while we churned upwind, the boat fell off instantly without any need of easing the large-roached mainsail. An additional benefit of the light helm is that it puts a small load on an autopilot; the blade is powerful, balance point spot on.

Form and function take precedence over styling statements on Rod Johnstone’s designs. Moving around the boat is easy and there are handholds and foot braces just about everywhere they are needed. The winch placements are logical and the wide side decks have good non-skid. The deep cockpit locker has a gasketed lid and is also accessible through a door aft of the galley, which allows you to avoid the sometimes painful contortions involved with getting a sail or inflatable dinghy out of the nether regions. There is no awkwardness in getting below. The companionway ladder is sturdy and safe to use even when the boat is heeled and bounding over waves.

The J/120, as delivered, lacks a quilted homeyness found on many 40-foot cruisers.It does not lend itself immediately to long-term live-aboards, but there is certainly enough space and stowage for two couples to cruise for a fortnight or more. A few accommodation innovations are worth a closer look. Bedding on this boat can be stowed inside throw-pillow covers — solving the problem of what to do with bedding during the day and piles of pillows at night. Also dual-purpose seat back cushions on the settees serve as cockpit cushions. This solves the bulky stowage problem of deck cushions, but introduces some new concerns about lack of waterproofness and whether bringing damp, salty cushions below creates more of a problem than it actually resolves.

One of the few space conflicts on the J/120 is created by the asymmetrical chute in its snuffer, which can remain hooked up to its sheets and halyard and be stowed conveniently inside the forward hatch. This puts it on the forward bunk. The crew must decide whether sail stowage or human comfort wins out in the forward cabin.

The value of the J/120 comes from building costs that have gone into substantive structures and quality gear. The base price of $162,600 is certainly attractive, but typical buyers opt for a variety of extras that boost this figure up to anywhere from $220,000 to $230,000. The boat that we sail tested cost about $247,000, which included the carbon fiber rig, radar on a removable pole, full sailing instruments, and autopilot, among other things. It is worth noting that the following items are also on the option list: hot and cold pressure water, 110-volt shore power, refrigeration, propane stove and oven, opening ports in cabin trunk, molded anchor well and removable bow roller. Certainly, the advantage of this is that a buyer does not pay for items not needed.

Overall, I agree with Bill Lee’s comments about this boat. I found the J/120 handsome, fun and easy on maintenance. — Sheila McCurdy

J/120 SPECIFICATIONS:

LOA 40’0″ (12.2 m.) LWL 35’0″ (10.7 m.) Beam 12’0″ (3.7 m.) Draft (deep) 7’0″ (2.1 m.) Draft (shoal) 5’11” (1.8 m.) Ballast 6,000 lbs. (2,722 kgs.) Displacement 12,900 lbs. (5,852 kgs.) Sail area 780 sq.ft. (72.5 sq.m.) Mast above water 62’7″ (19.1 m.) Ballast/Disp .47 Disp/Length 134 SA/Disp 22.7 Fuel tankage 27 gal. (102 l.) Water tankage 75 gal. (284 l.) Auxiliary Yanmar 3JH2-E 38-hp. 3-cyl. diesel Cabin headroom 6’2″ (1.9 m.) Designer Rod Johnstone Base price $162,600 (alum spar) $173,600 (carb spar)

J/Boats Inc. 557 Thames St. Newport, RI 02840 Phone (401) 846-8410

  • More: 2001 - 2010 , 31 - 40 ft , Bluewater Cruising , J/Boats , keelboat , monohull , racer / cruiser , Sailboat Reviews , Sailboats
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J30( is it a good Cruiser)

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Hi am thinking of geting a j30 for me and my wife. I am going to be crusing most of the time. I live in the caribean.Is J30 a good cruiser or some one have anothersugestion. I want a fast and performance cruiser so I can race her once in a while. Also does enyon Knows if ot is posible to instal a smal electric generator and a AC in ti. is ther roo n the boat for that. the caribbean is way hot and my wife wont put a foot on it unles she have ac and a tv for the nights  

j130 sailboat reviews

Rfagu, I have raced a 30. Fun boats, a lot of fun to sail. I always enjoy crewing on one as I will never own one because I do not think it is worth a crap as a liveaboard cruiser... especially for the islands. If you think your wife does not like the AC piece, wait until she gets stuck in that stripped down Corvette. Performance cruiser? What's your budget!!? Yes, there are performance cruisers but they ain't cheap. I think I would just get a Catalina so me and my wife were happy and comfortable 99.9% of the time and only race in races where they allow handicaps. Once you get all your crap on any boat you will never win any races anyways as the wateline will be just below the gunnels!! There are performance cruisers... but I will not go there. I do not believe in them as I think the two are mutually exclusive (OH LORD ISN"T THAT GOING TO GET ME SOME NASTY REPLIES). Just because it is a cruiser does not mean it has to be a slug... but many are. But a race boat as a cruiser... well, not me. I have been there. Nope, not me. I think you need to ask yourself which one is more important to you: racing in a race with no handicaps where you have a chance to win, or living aboard and cruising comfortably on a boat where you and your wife will be comfortable and you will not be thrown overboard while facing a mutiny. Peronally, I chose the later as I can only tread water for just so long. - CD  

Cruisingdad said: Rfagu, I have raced a 30. Fun boats, a lot of fun to sail. I always enjoy crewing on one as I will never own one because I do not think it is worth a crap as a liveaboard cruiser... especially for the islands. If you think your wife does not like the AC piece, wait until she gets stuck in that stripped down Corvette. I agree 100%....Rfagu, for what you want its bad...get a First or a Jeanneau Sun Fast...good rating and some cruiser/race qualities... Performance cruiser? What's your budget!!? Yes, there are performance cruisers but they ain't cheap. I think I would just get a Catalina so me and my wife were happy and comfortable 99.9% of the time and only race in races where they allow handicaps. YES..the wisest thing you ever said.... Once you get all your crap on any boat you will never win any races anyways as the wateline will be just below the gunnels!! Yes and no...depends on how carefull you are with wieght.... There are performance cruisers... but I will not go there. I do not believe in them as I think the two are mutually exclusive (OH LORD ISN"T THAT GOING TO GET ME SOME NASTY REPLIES). Depends, doesn't it CD??? Now....you just went crazy....and I was having good hopes about you.....what do you mean???? Of course you can have both...FIrst, Sun Odissey, Dufour new models but mostly he is right a Catalina will do perfect. Saw them finnaly CD...we'll talk later!!! Just because it is a cruiser does not mean it has to be a slug... but many are. But a race boat as a cruiser... well, not me. I have been there. Nope, not me. I'm happy.... I think you need to ask yourself which one is more important to you: racing in a race with no handicaps where you have a chance to win, or living aboard and cruising comfortably on a boat where you and your wife will be comfortable and you will not be thrown overboard while facing a mutiny. Peronally, I chose the later as I can only tread water for just so long. - CD Click to expand...

"There are performance cruisers... but I will not go there. I do not believe in them as I think the two are mutually exclusive " CD, sorry to disappoint but, I haven't had my nasty pills yet. <G> If you build a 40' boat with berths for eight and tankage and all and two heads....I'd argue that's a cruiser. Make a few different design choices in the same hull, like four berths and one head and half the tankage, and it might be a performance cruiser. You just need to make the compromises toward speed rather than payload or stowage. Take out the "Moorings" granite countertops and deluxe oven, use honeycomb instead of solids...I could see ways to emphasize performance without making a boat unsuitable for cruising. You, you've chosen to carry your wife on board. That kind puts you out of "performance" mode and solidly into "cruising" right there, doesn't it? <gd&r>  

I am not saying you cannot get a performance cruiser. How about an X? THere are others. I don't want a slug in the water, but the mindset of a cruiser has to be: 1) Safety, 2) Liveability, 3) Access to equipment, 4) Ability to put on equipment/gear, 5) Performance. In that order, in my book. Now, for a racer: 1) Safety (first or second, depending on whether we are talking offshore or beer cans), 2) Performance, 3) Ability to put on equipment/gear, 4) Access to equipment/gear, 5) Liveability. How do you rank the performance cruiser? Where is the compromise? There are compromises, in every boat. Unless you have a lot of money and want to design your own boat (Giu's, for example), go get a fat, comfortable, kick your feet out in the cockpit and grill hanging over the side cruiser. Pull a bloody racing dink behind you to get your speed fix. Keep the wife happy and you will be happier too. The whole racing boat for a cruiser thing sounds great at the docks and weekend cruising... but long term liveaboard (especially in the islands)... NO THANK YOU. I give you a month before you are shopping for a new boat or giving up cruising as too uncomfortable, or no fun, or too cramped, or blah, blah, blah... - CD PS Giu, I raced against a first 32 on my catalina 320 and beat him. Now you are going to say the bene did not know how to race!? (probably too because I don't either!!) Spilt my beer, busted a crystal glass going over, gave up racing on my own boat. Nah. When I get that very rare bug up my butt to race, I go crew on a buddy's J92. After the race is over, they all come over to my boat to drink as he even pulled out his bloody cushions as too much weight?*%!#! Whatever. Not my boat.  

CD- I'd argue that your fifth criteria, Performance, is a misnomer. Actually, "performance" can be defined as all of the other four criteria, so it is the first thing, not the last thing, on your list! I never had any interest in racing until someone said "There's a great steakhouse but we don't have charts, if we can get in there while there's still daylight..." and I began to look at how to make boats go faster.<G> "Keep the wife happy and you will be happier too." Ah, well, how many wives really want their men to be messing around with boats at all?<VBG> So, in my cruiser's mindset (I'm built for comfort not for speed, as they say), I'd read your cruising criteria this way: 1) Safety. In the outright cruiser? Maybe dual or triple redundancy and huge capacity for everything. In the "performance cruiser" ? All the same safety gear, just scaled down from Nuclear War to what I'm more likely to experience, and curtailed according to what I can avoid. Skip the forward battery and power windlass, take two anchors instead of three, now the bow is lighter and the boat will be faster and more comfortable in seas. Is it any less safe? Well, that's a subjective choice. 2) Liveability, One head instead of two?<G> One Korean butane burner and meals-in-one can probably keep me happy for a long time and knock another 100# of metal out of the galley. And, I don't need a blender, I'll buy "blender drinks" at a bar if I need them. A good peanutbutter jar makes a great cocktail shaker. Does that mean I'm slumming it? Probably.<G> 3) Access to equipment, Who cares about access, that's what the servants have to deal with. No, really.<G> If you want access, I suppose that means buy the bigger longer boat, which will be faster (performance) and load it lightly for good access. 4) Ability to put on equipment/gear, Are we talking about a Targa bar here?<G> Then again, I also love being dry under a bimini in the rain, but in these northern waters, running "furniture" all over the cockpit just seems like a blasted impediment to me. I've got a hat and hood if it rains or shines. 5) Performance. See? That's a part of everything you thought wasn't about performance! Now, did you want these JATO bottles installed on the pushpit, or the targa bar?  

Dear Hello, I have to admit. You are right. I succumb to your wit and wisdom. After reading such, I am now ready to recceomend he immediately put in his bid on the following boat: http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/cust...4QQihZ019QQcategoryZ63730QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem Of course, he will have to fight off Labatt... but hey, I love a good fight, and with that extra-long mast sticking off the front, he can finish the race before he starts... not to mention have an escape when his wife kicks his butt off the boat and begins shooting flares at him. Hell, this might be a lot of fun. Me and the kids will sit back on our un-performance Catalina and mixed drinks and watch the action unfold like the old outdoor movie theaters. You can come along if you want... (SMILE HELLO, TRYING TO MAKE YOU LAUGH)  

j130 sailboat reviews

There's one thing missing from this equation though. No boat is going to be faster than the skipper can sail it. So, basically, unless you're doing one design, it's the skipper that sails his boat to it's maximum potential that will win (in handicap racing at least). For me, living on my boat, if I just gotta race, I'd rather race a cruiser than live on a racer. That concept isn't too simple is it? <G>  

That's no mast, that's a bow sprit. Sheessshhhhh.  

CD- I'm EPA-licensed to metabolize mixed drinks. Easy to make me smile.<G>  

PB, You have not studied the architectual diagrams and history of the vessel. It is not a bow sprit. It is a mast. Let me give you the history lesson: In the early 1800s the skippers of the Macgregors placed their masts off the front of the boat such that when the vessel climbed up an extremely steep wave, they could thrown out another head sail from the Bow-Mast and make extra headway. This mast is often mistaken by less knowledgeable sailors as a bow sprit. It is a commong missconception amongst the confused and ignorant. Now, would you like me to give you the complet history of global warming too? - CD Surrender PB. I am right. You are wrong... and which side are you on anyways?  

Oh yeah, and Rfagu, just in case you are still there and have not quit sailnet completely, No, the j30 is not a good choice for a cruiser... a bruiser, maybe, not a cruiser.  

I'm on my side....of course!  

Thanks for your reply. I was having some doubt about the j30.You guys are correct I am trying on converting a race boat into a cruiser use to own a Dufour 42 , 1978. Great boat under heavy weather but in mile wind kind of slow. I am wiling to pay on a new boat around 20k to 30k. What boat you suggest fast cruiser.  

j130 sailboat reviews

the one with the longest water line you can find for that amount. there is no substitute for cubic inches  

Rfagu, I really don't see you getting a real performance cruiser at that price. Maybe an old first series (Bene) or a catalina. Can you get an od 36 for that (Catalina)? I have not looked. Others may know better. - CD  

CD- I'd have to agree with you. In my mind "performance cruiser" requires a good set of sails on the boat, not the ten year old bedsheets commonly found in that price range. (Simply because good sails cost money, darn it!)  

I know that for that amount is going to be hard. I am going to jump to the 80 to 100 k league. But a I going to have to wait a year more or less. Until these I will envy all of you. I will have to saty on shore with my feets dry until then. Thanx for your Coments. I would make a terrible mistake geting a j30 that I would not be satified.  

You are MUCH better off getting into that price range and buying a boat that will actually cost you less in the long run, keep you safer, and make you more comfortable. Don't go buy a slug. A motosailor is not for you. But forget this whole I want to go fast in my cruising boat idea. I have been there. Just enjoy the scenery and haul a dink behind you that you can haul out on. It is so damned shallow over there anyways you will have a lot more fun. - CD Catalina, Beneteau, Jeauneau. Good boats. Cheap. All three will serve you well for that use.  

Sunsail are seling a few jeauneau 36, 2002 for a very good price under 80k.Would you buy a boat that has been charter? I think that for the correct sum of money I will.  

No, I would not buy one. i have heard both sides of the story. Some say it is ok, others say not. You are better off waiting and looking for a cruising boat that has had liveaboards that just returned and are selling. You will get mostly gear that works, a boat that has been well taken care of, and is obviously capable. If you are going to take out a loan on the boat, you may be better of with a final note in excess of 100k. That is the break point for a 20 yr note and lower interest rates. Why? Don't ask me. I have never understood it. But a 100k note will cost you less/month than a 99k note. If you are paying cash, sit back and wait for the right boat. Get a broker that is knowledgeable. I like using brokers (that are knowledgeable). Where are you located?  

j130 sailboat reviews

Personally, I would not buy a boat that has been in the charter business. Thats just me. They are probably very well and proffesionally maintained, but yet the interiors have most likely been abused by customers who don't care about the boat. We can debate this subject just like every other subject on these threads for days, and you will get about ten different opinions. For me, I looked for a slightly used boat. The search took a couple of years, but for me was worth it. Be patient, don't rush into any decisions.  

I live in Orlando but going back to my home town in Puerto Rico. I know I can get a good boat down there if I calm my ansiety to it. A lot o people buy them and their wife hated it and they dont use them. They will pay you to get them of their hands. A friend of mine bougth a Dufour 37 2004 or 2005 for les than 80k.I am just ready to go sailing . Thanx for all your help. Whenever I am ready to buy and find a boat I will let you guys know to hear your perspective, because you have really opend my eyes.  

Let me know. I will help in any way I can. - CD  

NO. They are race boats pure and simple. Yea, sure you could cruise on one but why would you want to, unless it was the only boat available. The only J30 I've been on had no standing headroom and you couldn't get it the heave to if your life depended on it. AND off shore it just might!. It's like saying, " does a 2'x6' walk in closet make a good bedroom?"  

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COMMENTS

  1. J/130 SAIL Review

    Abovedeck, the T-shaped cockpit is spacious, with wide side decks and well-placed coamings for the Lewmar 58 self-tailing winches. All lines are led aft, so all sails can be handled from the cockpit. The tapered Hall Spars triple-spreader section is supported by Navtec rod rigging. Belowdeck, the J/130 is bright and airy, with lots of off-white ...

  2. J/130 Offshore Review

    My experience with powerful lightweight boats was limited to inshore and buoy racing, so sailing the J-130 offshore was to be a unique experience for all of us. Fast passages are always a joy and we were told the 130 was going to provide some fast sailing. The speed factor played well for us as we were able to avoid the worst of one weather ...

  3. J/130 Pacific Yachting Review

    The J/130's combination of outstanding sail-carrying power and ease of handling for small crews translates into seemingly effortless speed. This year's Southern Straits Classic attracted an unusually impressive assortment of high-end racing yachts. Conditions ranged from light to gale-force, and many competitors had hairy tales to tell afterward.

  4. J44 vs J130

    For racing the j130 will be a much easier, lighter boat to sail, requiring less crew and fewer lines running around the boat. The J44 is a bit roomier and if setup properly will be more comfy on a 2 week family cruise. As for the 120. I love the boat - great PHRF raiting crappy IRC rating (esp around the bouys) - dont expect to do well in a ...

  5. J/130

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5

  6. Cruising Boat Designs: J/130

    The SA/D is an indicator of the size of the sailplan relative to the boat's displacement. The typical cruising boat has a SA/D in the range of 12 to 18. Racing yachts generally have an SA/D of 20 and up. So, clearly, the J/130 could be described as a lightweight sportscar with a big engine. That translates into good light air performance and ...

  7. J/130

    The higher a boat's D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³ D: Displacement of the boat in pounds. LWL: Waterline length in feet

  8. J/130: Reviews, Specifications, Built, Engine

    1 of 2. If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of J/130. Built by J Boats and designed by Rod Johnstone, the boat was first built in 1994. It has a hull type of Fin w/bulb & spade rudder and LOA is 13.01. Its sail area/displacement ratio 25.21.

  9. 1994 J Boats 130 Racer/Cruiser for sale

    1994 J Boats 130. Experience sailing with the J/130 -with Its blend of sail power and effortless handling, perfect for smaller crews, ensures a sail filled with speed.The J/130 is built with materials known for their strength and durability. 1. Its low center of gravity guarantees windward performance, even without crew members on the rail.

  10. J 30 good boat ? Jeff, please let me know

    J-30''s are complicated to categorize. They, like the earlier J-24, were real pioneers in the evolution of yacht design. In their day they were about as fast as a 30 footer could get. Compared to other 30 foot race boats of that era they required pretty small crews and were very easy to handle. Over the years there have been (and in some areas ...

  11. Performance

    J/130 is a light displacement design born of modern materials of exceptional strength and durability. She has: 1) A very low center of gravity to achieve a high righting moment for good windward performance without crew on the rail, 2) A long waterline length to beam ratio for superb directional stability and safe tracking in large offshore seas, and 3) A generous sail area to wetted surface ...

  12. J/130 (J/Boats)

    Sailboat specifications. Last update: 10th April 2020. The J/130 is a 42'10" (13.04m) cruiser-racer sailboat designed by Rod Johnstone (United States). She was built between 1994 and 2002 by J/Boats (United States) with 43 hulls completed.

  13. J/120 Sailboat Review

    The J/120, as delivered, lacks a quilted homeyness found on many 40-foot. cruisers.It does not lend itself immediately to long-term live-aboards, but there is certainly enough space and stowage for two couples to cruise for a fortnight or more. A few accommodation innovations are worth a closer look.

  14. J/30 Sailing Review

    J/Boats is the world leader in high-performance sailboats- designed for cruising, day sailing, offshore racing, one-design racing. ... J/30 Sailing Review. ... and the slickly printed, annual J130 Journal is crammed with fleet news, national results, sailing tips, racing regs and a membership roster.

  15. J Boats J/130 for sale

    21. Contact. 206-558-1463. 1. Sort By. Filter Search. View a wide selection of J Boats J/130 for sale in your area, explore detailed information & find your next boat on boats.com. #everythingboats.

  16. J130

    The J/130, a scaled-up version, has taken the best attributes of that design and packaged them with enhanced comfort and improved performance, and come up a winner as well. When the panelists test-sailed this boat, they lined up against two all-out IMS race boats, and the comparison was impressive. Upwind and down this simply rigged 43 footer ...

  17. J30( is it a good Cruiser)

    SailNet Archive Discussion starter. 87689 posts · Joined 1999. #1 · Jan 31, 2007. Hi am thinking of geting a j30 for me and my wife. I am going to be crusing most of the time. I live in the caribean.Is J30 a good cruiser or some one have anothersugestion. I want a fast and performance cruiser so I can race her once in a while.

  18. J Boats J 130 boats for sale

    Find 19 J Boats J 130 boats for sale near you, including boat prices, photos, and more. Locate J Boats dealers and find your boat at Boat Trader! ... Reviews; Toggle navigation. Home / / Boats for Sale / / J Boats / / J 130. J Boats J 130 boats for sale. Back To Top. Save Search Save Search. Clear All j-130. Location. Zip City / State

  19. Tech Specs

    J/130 Offshore Sailboat Technical specifications & dimensions- including layouts, sailplan and hull profile. ... About J/Boats History Year by Year Review. The J/ Difference #1 Performance Brand Spritboat Revolution PHRF Ratings. Customer Service Contact Us Owner Resources Request Information