Cal 20 "One design sailing for everyone…"

The California 20 was designed by C. William Lapworth in 1960 and went into production in 1961. It quickly became the most popular of the Cal line of fiberglass sailboats and 1,945 of the boats were built. Most of the production occurred throughout the 60’s when the Jensen Marine Factory in Costa Mesa, California was turning out as many as one boat a day! Though production ceased in 1975, the Cal 20 is still perhaps the most common boat you will see in marinas on the west coast of the U.S.

cal 20 sailboats

Cal 20’s were (and still are) inexpensive to buy, own and maintain. The base price was $3,200 throughout most of the 60’s which put her within reach of just about everyone. The cockpit is nearly 8' long and is self-bailing. Below she has four bunks, a head and storage bins. For her 20' length, she is one of the most practical boats imaginable. With the advent of expensive fiberglass resin (during the fuel crisis of 1973) and the new I.O.R. rule, Cal 20's gained rapidly in popularity. A lot of people wanted an active, simple, inexpensive one-design class boat that wasn’t going to be outdated by the next measurement rule change. Even today the resale value of a good, clean Cal 20 is approximately what the same boat might have cost new 30 years ago!

Cal 20’s caught on quickly in many areas across the country. Today there are approximately ten active Cal 20 fleets in the Class Association; fleets from California, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii, and a fleets in British Columbia, Canada. Cal 20's have always been actively raced and with the large number of boats around and the strong fleet associations, the racing is very competitive. The Cal 20 fleets provide an excellent opportunity for local racing, socializing, and sharing tips and information on equipment and tuning. Many fleets hold regular social mixers and this is a great opportunity to enjoy the comradery of the Cal 20 sailors.

The Cal 20 Class Association holds an annual Class Championship Regatta. Held in quite a few different areas, this regatta has had as many as 50 boats racing in recent years. The Class Championship event includes a Junior Championship and includes Gold/Silver/Bronze fleets with separate starts to accommodate different skill sets. This format has proven popular and provides an opportunity for good racing amongst your peers. The Gold fleet determines the Class Champion and the Gold fleet typically attracts 25 to 35 boats for high caliber, one design racing.

cal 20 sailboats

The Cal 20 offers many strong qualities for both casual day sailing and racing. One of the best qualities about the boat is her large cockpit, which is nearly 8' long and self-bailing. This makes her a very good day sailor as well as a comfortable boat to race. When day sailing or cruising, four people in the large cockpit is quite comfortable. When racing, the crew doesn't have to leave the cockpit to get their weight in the right place because the right place for crew weight is at the forward end of the Cal 20 cockpit (by the bulkhead) where the crew naturally ends up. Sitting inward with no hiking also facilitates crew comfort. This "built-in" accommodation makes a Cal 20 a much more comfortable boat to race than many other boats around today.

Present day boats are rigged with easy to reach sail controls including back stay, jib halyard, boom vang, and main cunningham. 2:1 jib sheet purchase makes for easy jib adjustments without the need for a winch. Boats can be raced with either two or three crew. The Cal 20 sports a well-balanced helm with an easy groove. All these features add up to a great boat that is simple, versatile, fun to sail, and comfortable for everyone on board.

Cal 20’s race under one-design class rules which include minimum boat weight, sail dimensions, and spar/rudder/keel measurements. These rules help ensure that the boats are equalized and help control costs. Used boats with trailers are very affordably priced from around $1,500 to as much as around $10,000 for retrofitted/modernized boats. It is not at all uncommon to see a “beater” boat with original 1960’s vintage patina gel coat racing neck and neck with a repainted/faired/modern rigged Cal 20. This is the inherent beauty of the Cal 20 class. You cannot “buy” your way to the front of the fleet and hence a Cal 20 sailing program is very affordable. Several sailing lofts actively support the Cal 20 Class and competitive used sails can also be purchased from the more active racers. Boats are typically dry sailed on trailers and towing a Cal 20 by car is very easy. Rigging a Cal 20 is a breeze and allows more time for sailing and socializing.

cal 20 sailboats

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cal 20 sailboats

Cal 20 Sailboat Boats for sale

1984 CAL 24' Sailboat Galvanized Tandem Trailer Rhode Island

1984 CAL 24' Sailboat Galvanized Tandem Trailer Rhode Island

East Greenwich, Rhode Island

Category Racer Boats

Length 24.0

Posted Over 1 Month

This is my 1984 25th Anniversary Special Edition Cal 24' Sailboat with tandem axle galvanized trailer I have owned the boat for the last several years and it has seen little use in that time. The boat is in good shape for its age. The following work was done within the last two years I have owned it. Please review all pictures. I have detailed pictures unlike most showing 5 pictures. Johnson 7.5HP outboard can be purchased additonally Trailer: New 3,500lb dual axlesNew galvanized wheels/tiresNew wiring/lightsPainted Boat supportsFenders Boat: Standing rigging replacedWiring replaced (connection from cabin to mast needs to be completed)Bottom stripped/barrier coated 1 layer of bottom paintMail sail 2-3 years old1 genoa no roller furlingBoom VangAluminum anchor and rhode Hull is in good shape for its age with no soft spots on deck or major damage. Has usual cracks and dings here and there. Interior has all cushions, cooler step, drop down table, porta potie etc. Bulkheads are solid and well as stainless keel bolts. I hate to sell it but do not have time to use it and would rather let someone else enjoy it. Title for boat in hand as well as registration for trailer. Full payment is required within 7 days of listings ending. Hull Type: Fin w/spade rudderRig Type: Masthead SloopLOA: 24.67' / 7.52mLWL: 20.00' / 6.10mBeam: 8.00' / 2.44mListed SA: 261 ft2 / 24.25 m2Draft (max.) 4.25' / 1.30mDraft (min.) Disp. 3300 lbs./ 1497 kgs.Ballast: 1175 lbs. / 533 kgs.SA/Disp.: 18.89Bal./Disp.: 35.60%Disp./Len.: 184.15Designer: C. Raymond Hunt & Assoc.Builder: Bangor Punta Marine (USA)Construct.: FGBal. type: LeadFirst Built: 1983Last Built: # Built: AUXILIARY POWER (orig. equip.)Make: YanmarModel: Type: DieselHP: 8TANKSWater: 12 gals. / 45 ltrs.Fuel: 15 gals. / 57 ltrs.RIG DIMENSIONS KEYI: 29.75' / 9.07mJ: 9.30' / 2.83mP: 25.75' / 7.85mE: 9.50' / 2.90mPY: EY: SPL: ISP: SA(Fore.): 138.34 ft2 / 12.85 m2SA(Main): 122.31 ft2 / 11.36 m2Total(calc.)SA: 260.65 ft2 / 24.21 m2DL ratio: 184.15SA/Disp: 18.86Est. Forestay Len.: 31.17' / 9.50mBUILDERS (past & present)More about & boats built by: Jensen Marine/Cal BoatsMore about & boats built by: Bangor Punta Corp.DESIGNERMore about & boats designed by: Raymond Hunt (C.R. Hunt & Assoc.)NOTESShoal Draft version: Draft= 3.33' Bal.=1400 lbs.

1984 CAL 24' Sailboat Galvanized Tandem Trailer Rhode Island

Narragansett, Rhode Island

1968 Jensen Marine Cal 20 sailboat with 2009 Suzuki 4-stroke outboard

1968 Jensen Marine Cal 20 sailboat with 2009 Suzuki 4-stroke outboard

Carbondale, Colorado

Make Jensen Marine

Model Cal 20

Category Daysailer Sailboats

Length 20.0

1968 Jensen Marine Cal 20 fiberglass sailboat. 20' length, 7' beam. Fixed keel with 850lb ballast. 3'4" draft. 8' cockpit. 2009 4hp Suzuki 4-stroke outboard motor included. Long shaft. Only 62.6hrs. Very reliable and uses very little gas. Recently refinished trailer with new tires included. Jib and main sail are in good condition. No spinnaker. Mast, stays and sheets all in good working order. Sleeps/entertains four. 12 volt marine battery runs cabin lights stereo and a DC outlet. Running lights need to be replaced and re-wired. AM/FM/CD/MP3 player with usb/aux jacks. Two speakers. Bilge pump included and plumbed but needs to be wired. An anchor and four life vests are included. The hull has a soft spot where it sits on the trailer bunk (see photo). It pops back out as soon as it is in the water. She may not be pretty but she is complete and can be sailed as-is. It is currently on its trailer in Western Colorado and is ready to be towed away by it's new owner. Delivery within a 200 mile radius can be arranged. Please make an offer as I am motivated to sell. Thank you.

40' Cal 40 Cruiser

40' Cal 40 Cruiser

Gig Harbor, Washington

Cal 40's are classics, stable, fast, and still embarrassing some of those pricey newer boats. This Cal 40, s/v Moonday, has been owned by the same owner for 20 years, sailed locally, to Mexico, Hawaii & back to the PNW, and is waiting for a new owner. One of the best performing racer/cruisers, CAL 40s are comfortable, particulary in heavy air, and off the wind. She points as well as most modern fin keel designs with higher aspect rigs, yet she is balanced and easily sailed. A legendary racing yacht and member of the American Sailboat Hall Of Fame, these boats were the talk of the town during production in the 60's, and they are still seen on many Hawaii races and out cruising. Someone asked Stan Honey why he's sailing on a CAL 40, and the answer was "No bad Habits"! With her Monitor windvane and comortable cruising interior, s/v Moonday is a remarkable value. http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_full_detail.jsp?slim=broker&boat_id=2634924&ybw=&hosturl=gigharbor&&ywo=gigharbor&&units=Feet&access=Public&listing_id=980&url=&hosturl=gigharbor&&ywo=gigharbor&

CAL 28 Sailboat 1988 designed by C Raymond Hunt Yanmar Diesel SAILAWAY CONDITION

CAL 28 Sailboat 1988 designed by C Raymond Hunt Yanmar Diesel SAILAWAY CONDITION

Milford, Connecticut

1988 Cal 28 Sloop rigged sailboat. Designed by C Raymond Associates. This is a well respected yard maintained boat, that has been put on the market because the owner has just purchased a new boat. This is an opportunity to make a offer on a well founded and sail away condition boat. LOA 28 ft. 0 in. BEAM 10 ft. 5 in. Minimum Draft 5 ft. 3 in. Displacement 7800 lbs. Headroom 6 ft. 1 in. Yanmar Diesel Engine 2GM20F 18 hp. Fresh water cooled. 1988 model 2 blade propeller. Tanks consist of Fresh Water 20 gal. Fuel 16 gal. Approved Holding Tank. Electrical. A 12V DC Electrical System with a Balmar High Output Alternator 2 Group 27 Batteries (new 2014) 110V AC Electrical System with 30 Amp Shore Power. A Statpower 10 Amp Battery charger. Instruments. Raymarine ST60 Tridata Depth and Speed Datamarine Wind Instruments. Furuno GP-31 GPS Autohelm ST4000 Autopilot Icom IC-M402 VHF Radio Ritchie Compass GPS wheel mounted Garmin CD Stero Sails and Rigging. Deck stepped Selden Aluminum mast Hood roller furling 2 Barient 21 Primary winches 2 Barient 17 Self tailing winches 2006 Neil Pride Mainsail 2005 Neil Pride Genoa Edson Wheel Steering Accommodations. The Cal 28 has a single stateroom layout. The stateroom is forward with a V-berth. The salon features a center placed drop leaf table with a settee on port and starboard with storage behind the seat backs and above in shelves. There is a Nav station and a Galley is opposite to port. Aft there is a large Quarter Berth to port an a enclosed Head with shower to starboard. Interior highlights include: 6 ft. 1 in. headroom Propane Stove 6 Gallon Water Heater (new 2014) Large opening hatches. Clean Bright Interior. If you require further details and photos feel free to call Dr. Jack Levine at 203 982 4808. The boat is in the water and is actively being sailed. The location of the Cal 28 is Milford Harbor in Milford Connecticut. FREE! Sellers: Add a FREE map to your listings. FREE!

CAL 28 Sailboat 1988 designed by Bill Lapworth Yanmar Diesel SAIL AWAY CONDITION

CAL 28 Sailboat 1988 designed by Bill Lapworth Yanmar Diesel SAIL AWAY CONDITION

1988 Cal 28 Sloop rigged sailboat. Designed by Bill Lapworth. This is a well respected yard maintained boat, that has been put on the market because the owner has just purchased a new boat. This is an opportunity to make a offer on a well founded and sail away condition boat. LOA 28 ft. 0 in. BEAM 10 ft. 5 in. Minimum Draft 5 ft. 3 in. Displacement 7800 lbs. Headroom 6 ft. 1 in. Yanmar Diesel Engine 2GM20F 18 hp. Fresh water cooled. 1988 model 2 blade propeller. Tanks consist of Fresh Water 20 gal. Fuel 16 gal. Approved Holding Tank. Electrical. A 12V DC Electrical System with a Balmar High Output Alternator 2 Group 27 Batteries (new 2014) 110V AC Electrical System with 30 Amp Shore Power. A Statpower 10 Amp Battery charger. Instruments. Raymarine ST60 Tridata Depth and Speed Datamarine Wind Instruments. Furuno GP-31 GPS Autohelm ST4000 Autopilot Icom IC-M402 VHF Radio Ritchie Compass GPS wheel mounted Garmin CD Stero Sails and Rigging. Deck stepped Selden Aluminum mast Hood roller furling 2 Barient 21 Primary winches 2 Barient 17 Self tailing winches 2006 Neil Pride Mainsail 2005 Neil Pride Genoa Edson Wheel Steering Accommodations. The Cal 28 has a single stateroom layout. The stateroom is forward with a V-berth. The salon features a center placed drop leaf table with a settee on port and starboard with storage behind the seat backs and above in shelves. There is a Nav station and a Galley is opposite to port. Aft there is a large Quarter Berth to port an a enclosed Head with shower to starboard. Interior highlights include: 6 ft. 1 in. headroom Propane Stove 6 Gallon Water Heater (new 2014) Large opening hatches. Clean Bright Interior. If you require further details and photos feel free to call Dr. Jack Levine at 203 982 4808. The boat is in the water and is actively being sailed. The location of the Cal 28 is Milford Harbor in Milford Connecticut.

1978 Cal Yachts 2-27

1978 Cal Yachts 2-27

Millersville, Maryland

Private Seller (443) 994-1407 Photos Photo 1 Photo 2 Close Request Information * Name First Name * Email Telephone (optional) Best Time to Contact Anytime Morning Mid-day Evening Question/Comments (optional) Shop Safely: Protect Your Money. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. Contact Seller 1978 Cal Yachts 2-27,1978 Cal 2-27 SailboatGreat boat that is in very clean condition. Many extras and upgrades!27 Foot, 4'6" draft. Completely updated Atomic 4 inboard gas 30hp engine. Full support still available for this bulletproof engine! Harken Roller furling system, 150 Genoa, Storm jib and Main sails.Northstar 8 inch GPS/Chartplotter/Depth Sounder.Two anchors, chain and two complete anchor rodes. New interior that sleeps 5. Custom interior carpet.Pressure fresh water system. Electric toilet.Alcohol 2 burner stove. Custom Textaline Cockpit Cushions.All Exterior Teak preserved with Cetol Marine Finish this year. Two Batteries with new 20 Amp Charger installed in the last year.Bottom painted 2013 with Multi-year Pettit Paint, with new Prop installed as well.Mast/Rigging professionally tuned 2014. This boat is ready to sail away. Needs nothing done to it to enjoy this summer on the Bay! We upgraded to a slightly bigger boat so we need to move on and let this well cared for boat go to it's 3rd owner. We've owned it for 32 years!Please contact for further specs and full details on this great boat! Asking $9800 OBO. Please contact to schedule a viewing and make see in person the details and cleanliness of this boat! Boat is located on the Severn River in Maryland, outside of Annapolis, MD. We will deliver the boat by water within a reasonable distance from Annapolis. You might see cheaper boats in this size, however Cal built a very good and strong boat. After seeing all the details in this boat You'll be glad you took the time to consider this turn key boat! $9800, 4439941407 Be sure: Get a boat history report|Finance this boat|Get an insurance quote|

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Cal20PDX.NET

Rockin' good boats since 1961

Steve Rander’s Cal 20 Guide

Boat maintenance and everything you always wanted to know about your cal 20.

(Text below is work in progress to adapt the original to web content – click here for a PDF of the original book)

Your Cal’s Seaworthy Condition

  • Structure of a Cal 20
  • Fore and aft lower shroud attachments
  • Upper shroud attachments
  • Headstay attachment
  • Backstay attachment
  • Rudder attachments
  • Backing plates

Your Cal’s mast and rigging

  • Identifying your mast section
  • Rocking masts
  • Rigging wire inspection
  • Turnbuckles and clevis pins
  • Split rings and cotter pins
  • Single lower shrouds
  • Rigging a split backstay
  • Controlling mast travel
  • Your rig at the dock
  • Boom vangs and out hauls
  • How loose or tight should the rig be?
  • Rig adjustment at the dock

Going faster

  • Bottom preparation and paints
  • Keel fairing (what is allowed)
  • All those control lines
  • Installing KT meters or depth sounders
  • Fitting your engine plate (speed trap)

Going Racing

  • Required on board Gear
  • Cal-20 Bylaws
  • Fleet 7 Bylaws
  • PIYA Regulations,
  • USCG Requirements

Maintenance

My cal has water inside.

  • Companionway Hatch
  • Cockpit Drain
  • Gel coat, what is it?
  • Cracks in my deck serious or not?
  • Bottom blisters
  • Fiber glass repair

Painting My Cal-20

Photos of Cal-20 Details

Internet Links and U-Tube Demonstrations

North Tuning Guide

A Classy Twenty-Footer

Cal-20 A Pocket Cruiser

Cal-20 Owners Manual

Preparing a Cal-20 for Racing

Structure of a Cal-20

The Cal-20 is made up of basically three fiberglass parts bonded together with multiple pieces of plywood bonded or mechanically fastened to support the fiberglass parts and keep the whole box section from twisting.

The hull liner is bonded in place and has flanges to take the plywood bunk tops and bulkheads which in turn are tabbed to the hull.

There are additional transverse bulkheads forward forming a chain locker and forward bunk support. There have been three different interior arrangements over the years the most notable difference is that the early Cal-20’s had a full main bulkhead and later boats had posts to support the deck beam.

This structure is more complex then it first appears and relies on the sum of its parts to properly carry and transfer the dynamic sailing loads. Failure of any of the components may not appear to make any difference but it does.

Loose bunk tops or bulkheads allow the box like structure to twist while sailing. This twisting may mean that your hull shape may not be optimal or the rig may be sagging and not developing the power it should.

Checking the structure:

Look for rotten plywood throughout the boat and replace it as soon as time and money will allow.

Look for loose tabbing on bunks and bulkheads where they meet the hull (even the one under the bunk) repair loose tabbing by removing the old, sanding both the plywood and hull surface with 80 grit and the bonding new tabbing ( usually 3 laminates of 6oz fiberglass cloth) back in place with epoxy. Don’t forget to look on the back side to see if the object you are bonding wasn’t bonded on both sides.

Look for cracks in the liner and if found grind back and repair the laminate. Look to see if the cracked liner doesn’t need some additional reinforcement.

Check the deck in way of hardware and especially chain plate areas for rotten wood in both the deck and hardware backing blocks.

If things are really shot plan for a big winter project but in the mean time do an area repair in the high load areas.

Check the rudder attachments to the hull to be sure that their backing blocks are good and the bolts are not loose (Mine have a tendency to work loose).

Check for cracks in the deck along side the main hatch runners. These cracks often are structural and allow water to migrate to the 1X2 that the hatch track screws into causing it to rot out.

See diagram pg.40

Look and see if there is a piece of plywood under the cockpit (between it and the hull or liner) giving it support. If not you run the risk of having cracks form in the corners of the companionway cutout. This missing piece of plywood will also allow the deck to flex when sailing meaning the Headstay tension will constantly change.

The Cal-20 came from the builder with two lower shrouds and what was thought to be a robust rig. We have over the years worked to get more performance from our boats and have changed things from what the original builder had in mind.

The first thing we did was remove the forward lower shrouds so the jib would move easier across the deck as we tacked.

The next thing we did was to add a split backstay and an adjustment tackle

And now we have loosened up the rig so we can move the center of effort forward and aft as we change directions from up wind to down wind.

All of these changes have come at a price and the price is that we are loading parts of the boat beyond what they were designed for.

To keep our boats together in one piece we have to upgrade the strength of the attachment points that hold our rig up.

The first is the aft lower shroud attachment point. This can be done by removing the bronze casting from the deck that the forward lower use to attach to and bolting it on the underside of the deck to the aft lower shroud attachment point. Next get a ¼” turnbuckle and a small chain plate and attach them to the underside and bolt the chain plate through the hull side.

See diagram for chain plate pg.4

The next is the Headstay. It turns out that we can put so much tension on the Headstay with the backstay adjuster that it is possible to literally pull the deck off the hull.

The fix is easy, just attach a chain plate to the bow so that some of the bolts go through the hull and attach the Headstay to that chain plate instead of the bronze deck fitting.

See diagram pg. 5

Keel Bolts and Keel Fairing

Let’s start with the bolts, if the keel is in good condition or you don’t want to deal with it at this time the bolts can be removed one at a time while the boat is on the hard.

If the nuts are very rusty (probably why you want to replace them) it is unlikely they will come off and it will take a die grinder and cut off wheel to make a slice down one side. You can then place a cold chisel in the slit and break the nut into two halves. If you are unsuccessful have fun cutting the other side of the nut.

Once the nut is off you can pound the bolt down and out the bottom. Some fairing putty will most likely come with it.

If I am just replacing the bolts and not taking the keel loose for some reason you can take a little caulking cotton and wrap it around the shank of the new 5/8” 316 stainless steel flathead bolt and smear Life caulk around it and the hole before tightening the nut.

When you have done them all check to see that they are all close to the same tightness, how tight? 150 foot pounds should be enough (a 50 pound pull on a 3’ breaker bar).

If this is all you are doing check the fairing around the keel and repair as needed remembering it is ok to fair it into the hull both fore and aft but not side to side. You may only put a ¼” radius at the sides.

Keel Fairing

Keel fairing can be nothing more then chipping a few spots and puttying in a few divots. For this epoxy putty is the best. If you are only dealing with a little rust try Pettit Rust Loc Primer. Remove any flaking rust and apply three or more coats following the directions on the can.

Major keel work is an undertaking and ask around before you start it. It is best saved for a winter project if you wish to sail in the summer.

Remove the keel and take it to a sand blaster. Have it blasted to bare metal (I am reluctant to say grey metal as some of our keels will have holes blown through them before they get to that point. Once blasted take it your work place immediately and epoxy coat the whole thing. Once the epoxy “B” stages lay it down on one side and smear epoxy putty on one side making it a pretty as you can. Grind down the surface when cured and finish the rough fairing. Sand again and roll the keel over. This side will need a sanding before coating then smear your putty on this side. Let cure, sand and putty again. Sand it again then stand it up and finish and fairing before you bolt it back on the boat.

Bolting the keel back on

Check that the keel is straight front to back (some aren’t) Adjust the bolt holes if needed. Check to see that the keel is not angled to the port or starboard side when it is bolted up and the boat is supported level side to side (may require washers placed under the flange between the hull and keel. If this is the case there is only one way to put the keel back on and that is with epoxy). If you need to epoxy it on come see me first and let’s talk.

If the keel is going back on with Life Caulk just be sure and use enough, I still like a little cotton on the bolt shanks. Clean up all the extra caulk and then putty in the fairing remembering not to fair the sides.

Cal-20 Mast and Rigging

What mast and boom are on my boat?

A good rule of thumb is that hulls 70-340 had Spar Craft masts and booms and all others had Jensen masts and booms. The Jensen mast is 2 5/8”x 4” and the booms were 2 3/8”x 3 ½”. Some early boats had tapered masts, those which came with them could use them until they failed but could not replace them. No other boats are allowed to use tapered masts.

The original mast basses were two piece cast aluminum with an aft hinge pin. The failure of these basses when mast rocking became popular lead to the rocking mast basses.

All rigging wire should be inspected often it is 1/8” stainless 1×19 wire with swaged end terminals. Great care should be exercised when stepping masts to be sure that the turn buckles are faced aft before raising the mast. Be carful about snagging wires while stepping.

If any wire end should look corroded or have a broken strand at the swag

Or a kink in the wire it must be replaced before sailing again.

The same goes for bent turnbuckles. DO NOT STRIGHTEN A BENT TURNBUCKLE. Bent turnbuckles must be replaced.

All split rings or cotter pins should be tapped to prevent being snagged and pulled out by some sheet line.

Most everyone has eliminated the forward lower shrouds to make tacking easier. Due to this change the aft lower shroud attachment to the deck must be reinforced (see sketches).

The addition of a split backstay will give the racer much better control of the Headstay tension but it also means that the Headstay attachment to the bow must be reinforced (see sketches).

Putting a split backstay on is a simple matter of installing an extra chainplate on the stern and having the backstay cut and re-swaged by your local rigger.

How high to cut it and what to use as a tackle is subjective (note not higher the 10’ above the deck) so look around at other boats.

The whole mast rocking, loose rig thing started in California where the Cal-20’s race without spinnakers. It improves both up and down wind performance and has been adopted here in Portland as the thing to do.

With that said be aware that it does increase the load in every part of the standing rigging when it shock loads. Take care to secure your rig when you leave the dock so it is not banging around. It is also a good idea to try and reduce the shocks when sailing and crossing a motor boat wake.

Boom vangs can be of any configuration as long as they don’t hold the boom up (No Kicker style vangs). The Cal-20 boom has so little extension beyond the measurement band the one needs to either rig an internal multi part purchases or side blocks at the end of the boom.

We find ourselves utilizing the Cunningham, outhaul, Vang, sheet and backstay to shape main as well as the backstay, halyard and sheets to control the jib so take the time to be sure all is in good working order and easy to reach.

How loose should the rig be? See rig adjustment at the dock for a starting place.

Most important and most overlooked is to PRE FLIGHT your boat before going sailing each time. Look at or touch every cotter pin, clevis pin, and shackle. Trace the standing and running rigging with your eyes to be sure that all is in order. By taking the time to do this you will be assured of having a great sail without fire drills or failures.

Rig Adjustment at the dock

Most Cal-20’s are setting up their rigs so that they can rake aft up wind and rock forward down wind.

Start with the rig loose enough and with enough toggles in the Headstay to allow the measurements in the drawing to be reached 28’ +/- 1” from the upper black band to the top of the transom.

Allow enough slack in the adjustable backstay to allow 29” 5” +/- 1” when the rig is shoved forward.

Now adjust the uppers and aft lowers evenly on both sides of the boat so that when measured out from the mast parallel with the water 5’ above the deck you can deflect the uppers out to 18” and the lowers out to 21”. The jumpers should be adjusted to be slack (IE no load on them).

Please note: While this allows the rig to move forward and aft when it is sighted up from the bottom and the boat is under sail it should still be straight side to side but have a slight curve fore and aft.

Sailing a Cal with this rig configuration may place higher stress loads on the rigging then would a normally snug rig so take extra care to inspect wire ends, turnbuckles, clevis and cotter pins. Tape things to prevent snags or items coming loose. Don’t fail to inspect under tape for wire failures.

When sailing in light air with motor boat chop it may be prudent to tighten things up to prevent the rig from slamming.

Shock cords or line can be used to prevent the rig from slamming while the boat is tied to the dock.

It also may be prudent to sail with the rig tightened up in heavy conditions.

These instructions are not an endorsement of the loose rig they are only given as an approximation of what other Cal -20 sailors are doing.

As skipper you are responsible for the safety and security of your crew and vessel.

Going Faster

Bottom preparation is one of the major ways you can make your boat go faster right after learning to sail better, owning new sails and being first over the start line.

Bottom preparation can take as little or as much time as you can put into it but trust me every hour you put into your bottom will pay off on the race course.

I will start with the idea that you are a top notch sailor and are going out to win the nationals.

Take the rig out of the boat, take the keel off and roll the boat over so you can work on the bottom by pushing down not up.

Take all the paint off and fix any and all blisters by grinding them out and epoxy/glass repairing them.

Now take a 1×4 about 6 feet long and put some 80 grit sand paper on it (this comes in rolls with sticky on the back) and sand the bottom front to back. You will find that a couple blocks of wood glued to the back so you can hold on easier will help as will knee pads. It is also a good idea to lightly spray a little black lacquer on before you start to sand.

What you should see if the bottom was perfect is all the black gets sanded off and the bottom is smooth with no bumps or dips. Trust me this won’t be the case. So mark the dips with a felt pen by outlining them sand the black out of the dips and mix up some epoxy and micro spheres into putty and fill all the hollows. Use a wide sheet rock knife or a piece of metal if you need something longer. Go home and have a beer then come back the next morning and spray a little black tracer again and sand. When you have come back about six days or so things might be getting close so you will move to an acceptable under water primer and apply a few coats. Now you get to sand with 120 grit paper. When things have gotten to the point that you can come out in the dark and shine one light on the bottom and move it here and there and like what you see you are ready to turn it right side up and put it back together.

The keel was touched on lightly under Keel bolts pg 6 but it will need a similar treatment as the bottom of the hull. Keep in mind that there are limits under the rules as to how thick you can make the keel so when you are all done be sure that at no point is it thicker then 1 ½”.

The Rudder is the only thing left in contact with the water so if you are not using one of the fiberglass rudders but a wood one you must be sure that your rudder profile will fit the Cal-20 shape. There is some variation allowed and you will need to cut your blank out to the profile that you feel is best (I like the one that has the least amount of sweep back as the helm feel is lighter). Now you can proceed to shape the foil you like but again there is a maximum thickness when finished which is 2 ¼” and a minimum weight of 255 lbs. When you get all done be sure you have epoxy and glass coated the rudder so it won’t absorb water and never leave it in the water when not sailing.

All that is left to talk about is the bottom paint. If you are headed to the nationals or are 100% into racing then the answer is NO BOTTOM PAINT.

The bottom should have been worked down with multiple coats of epoxy primer and sanded to ever finer grit until now you are down around 400 or 600 grit and all the scratches follow the flow of the water meaning none go the wrong way.

If you are not that zealous a smooth bottom with no bumps or blisters and a prep sanding of 120 grit in a fore to aft direction and VC17 or SR21 applied will be your fastest bottom.

The next fastest is a smooth bottom with no blisters or ruff spots and what ever paint you are using (if not one of the two above) applied as smoothly as possible and perhaps a light sanding with wet paper.

Now that you have the underwater part of the boat is in perfect shape we need to look at the sails.

If they are old they are slow and that can get to the point that if they are a few hard races old they are slow which is why there are rules as to how often you can buy new sails. So the best answer is to take the very best care of the sails you have. Use the newest ones you have on race day and use the older ones for practice. Remember you can only have one set on board when you race.

I will not go into sail set as there is lots of information around on that subject.

I will mention however that if the controls for adjusting the shape of your sails are not convenient and easy to reach fix the problems and move the controls so you can adjust them easily.

Just imagine that you are trapped to leeward at the start line and need to power up and pull a bit ahead and then alter the shape so that you are now pointing better then the boat above you as you pull ahead (now you get why controls are important).

Most all of us here have adapted the rocking mast and that is covered under Rig Adjustment pg.11

Knot meters and depth sounders. Any thing that you put thru the hull that protrudes into the flow of water will slow you down.

Should you put a knot meter in or not? If you do be sure that the housing does not stick down. Make a recess in the hull bottom so that when the thru hull is installed it can be faired in completely and only the impeller sticks down.

While a knot meter may be a great tool to help tune your speed another boat beside you is a better tool. So get your head out of the knot meter and look at the boats around you.

Depth sounders in Cal-20’s should never be put thru the hull but glued to the inside with silicone. They will read just fine as long as you didn’t glue it on top of a void in your laminate.

The only time I have found one of value racing a Cal is on the long distance races and then only of marginal help. It was better to look at the beach I was sailing next to and judge the slope and if the beach was curving out into the water ahead.

Now that you have the underwater part of the boat in perfect shape we need to look at the sails. If they are old they are slow and that can get to the point that if they are a few hard races old they are slow which is why there are rules as to how often you can buy new sails. So the best answer is to take the very best care of the sails you have. Use the newest ones you have on race day and use the older ones for practice. Remember you can only have one set on board when you race.

Most all of us here have adapted the rocking mast and that is covered under Rig Adjustment pg .

Knot meters and depth sounders. Any thing that you put thru the hull that protrudes into the flow of water will slow you down. So should you put a knot meter in or not? If you do be sure that the housing does not stick down. Make a recess in the hull bottom so that when the thru hull is installed it can be faired in completely and only the impeller sticks down. While a knot meter may be a great tool to help tune your speed another boat beside you is a better tool. So get your head out of the knot meter and look at the boats around you. Depth sounders in Cal-20’s should never be put thru the hull but glued to the inside with silicone. The will read just fine as long as you didn’t glue it on top of a void in your laminate. The only time I have found one of value racing a Cal is on the long distance races and then only of marginal help. It was better to look at the beach I was sailing next to and judge the slope and if the beach was curving out into the water ahead.

Speed Trap AKA Outboard Well

Here is one of the reasons that some Cal’s go faster then others and why we pull our boats out over the winter so we can work on them a bit.

The photo on the next page shows a poorly fitting bottom plate on my outboard well. The little (no matter how small) lip hanging down catches water and creates drag.

The easiest way to fix this is to first be sure the plate is in with the right end forward (I have an arrow drawn on the inside in felt tip marker).

If it is in right and a bit of lip is hanging down take a hand saw and cut the bond loose between the wooden frame on the inside and the fiberglass bottom plate. It may take a couple cuts to create a bit of a gap. Mix up some epoxy putty and squeeze it into the gap. Clamp the gap closed until the epoxy cures.

Larger problems may take more drastic action like a total rebuild. There are only three things to remember in your zealous quest for the perfect motor well cover.

  • The cover must be removable without tools and it must pass water IE water poured in the well must flow out the bottom.
  • When you get all done with your creation the bottom plate can not be thicker then 3”.
  • You can not caulk the plate in place or putty up all the seams so it can’t be pushed out.

What ever you do to make your plate fit better will improve your performance.

When the perfect the motor plate is done you should not be able to see any difference in the bottom shape, only a thin line around the outer edge perhaps the thickness of a pencil line. This plate must be easily removable and it must drain water because if it doesn’t all your work will be for not as some measurer will not let you pass inspection. By the way I hope you did this work while you had the hull upside down.

The photo below shows a poorly fitting bottom plate on my outboard well. The little (no matter how small) lip hanging down catches water and creates drag.

Required Safety Equipment and Gear On Board

We race Cal-20’s here on the river in OCSA sanctioned races and as such utilize their Sailing Instructions and course charts. Additionally we are required to comply with the Bylaws of the Cal-20 Fleet and Local Fleet 7 bylaws. PIYA regulations and USCG requirements must also be met.

The following is a synapses of all the requirements and spell out what must be on board to legally race. There are a couple conflicts in the regulations which are spelled out at the bottom of the next page and which regulation takes precedence. The pages that follow are the complete rules and regulations.

Cal-20 By-Laws Require:

  • Sails for Class racing shall be limited to a mainsail and a class jib. The cloth weight shall not be less than three ounces.

SAFETY EQUIPMENT

  • All required government safety equipment must be carried. This includes a Type 1, 2 or 3 life preserver for each person; a bell, whistle or a horn; one throw-able Type 4 life preserver; and one fire extinguisher (if an engine or fuel is carried).
  • Suitable ground tackle must be carried on board at all times. The minimum allowable ground tackle is an 8-pound Danforth anchor or its equivalent, with 10 feet of 3/16 inch chain and 100 feet of 3/8 inch nylon line.

Cal-20 Fleet 7 Additional By-Laws Require:

1. Sails, Spinnaker equal to PHRF Standard size and not lighter then 3/4oz nylon

(.05 poly is approved)

2. Spinnaker pole of 7’4” inside jaw to inside jaw

3. Class whisker pole may be used with jib only

4. Outboard engine meeting the requirements of PIYA Cat III.

OCSA Safety Requires:

1. All Boats comply with USCG requirements for recreational boating.

2. All Boats comply with PIYA category IV regulations

3. Sail numbers required on Main Sail and Spinnaker

4. Navigation lights after sunset

PIYA category IV requires:

1. Soft wood plugs for any below water opening attached with short cord.

2. Adequate paddle(s) or oars

3. A commercially manufactured anchor, 150’ of line and ½ the boat length of chain.

4. Yachts name on all float-able safety gear.

5. Navigation lights after sunset

6. A Bailer, bucket or bilge pump.

7. A flotation device with a whistle, reflective tape and the ships or crews name for every person on board.

8. Engine, tanks, vents, batteries, etc. meet USCG requirements.

9. A signed copy of the PIYA regulations on board.

USCG requires:

1. State registration

2. State numbers and sticker

3. Life jacket for all on board

4. Type IV throw-able device

5. Three day/night flares

6. Ventilation for areas which hold fuel tanks

7. One B-1 fire extinguisher

8. A whistle or horn

9. Navigation lights after sunset

10. A type I, II, III MSD if a toilet is installed.

The only conflicting requirements I have found are the old Cal-20 requirement for 100 ft of anchor line and PIYA’s requirement of 150’ (150’ takes precedence)

The PIYA requirement for paddle(s) or oars in Cat IV and the Requirement for outboard in Cat III and Cal-20 Fleet 7 By-Laws (outboard takes precedence)

My Cal Has Water In Side

The sources of water inside a cal just like any other boat are endless.

Some are obvious like water running down the inside of the hull at a window or piece of deck hardware.

Others are less obvious like the bottom rudder bolts or the laminations around the outboard trunk. The keel bolts are a possibility but then so is the main hatch, fore hatch and seat hatch. What about those cracks where the cockpit sides meet the cockpit seats or along the main hatch runners? These are all possibilities.

How do I stop the water from getting in? First you have to identify the source.

You must dry the boat completely and that may take putting your crew on deck next to the starboard shroud and healing the boat over a bit bow down and moping water out from under the forward bunk or out from under the cabin side bunks. Water will also find its way in between the hull liner and the hull so it is not easy to get it dry but you must.

Start at the top and work your way down. Are there any deck fittings that are leaking? If so fix them by removing them and then re-bedding them. See the U-Tube links on page 51.

How about the windows? Seethe comments on page 39.

Now let’s look at the cracks along the main hatch runners and the ones in the cockpit. These two sets of cracks are caused from stress and many do not actually leak but if the stainless hatch slides are loose odds are the fasteners or cracks are leaking. Smearing some caulk on them might help for a day or two but they will need to be ground back about a half inch on each side and a bit of fiberglass and epoxy used to fix them (be neat as these are hard areas to detail. See pg 40

The fore deck hatch if it is original will be leaking where it is screwed to the deck but also in the joints in the corners. Remove it, clean it up and take it apart. Then glue it back together again. Be sure to put some cellophane package tape on the deck in the corners and lay out some protection on the bunk as you will want to re-glue this frame in place so it will fit when you are done. When the glue has cured pop it off and then bed it in Life caulk.

The main hatch might have cracks in the bottom corners (check that there is a support under the cockpit see photos pg 49)

If there are cracks in the corners remove the wood edging, grind a taper in the laminate and put some fiberglass and epoxy to fill up the taper. Now bed the wood trim back in place. Be particular about the bottom piece as water likes to run down the drop board and find its way in the corners.

The cockpit seat hatch has problems of its own. The first is that there is no drip lip on the edges of the hatch lid so water likes to run right around and drip inside. Yes a gasket on the lip of the cutout will help but it really needs a drip lip see pg 41.

We are now inside and you are going to have to crawl (slither) back with your flash light and get all the way back so you can see the rudder bolts. Have someone else stand at the back of the cockpit so they are under water. Give it a few minutes and if they leak you will need to remove the fitting and bolts (either 3 friends on the foredeck while you do this or get it back on the trailer) When you do bed the fitting and bolts be sure there is a backing block on the inside of something like ½” plywood about 3”x6” and fender washers. If you don’t want to crawl back there in a few weeks use nylock nuts.

Now before you slither out of that little hole you are in look at the bottom of the motor well. Look all the way around it as they leak at the base sometimes. If it is leaking mark the area and haul the boat to do a fiberglass / epoxy repair. Look and see if the cockpit drain you put in from the front right corner of the cockpit is leaking. If so fix it. See pg 43

The next things to look for are any old thru hulls. If there are any get rid of them see pg 42. Yes this needs to be done out of the water. If you have a knot meter or depth sounder that goes through the hull check to se if they are leaking.

The only other sources of leaks (as long as you don’t have hull damage) are the keel bolts. While checking the keel bolts don’t jump to the conclusion that they are leaking just because there is water in the bilge. I now you have dried everything and you set there and watch water seems to ooze up around the bolts. That does not mean they are leaking it may only mean that you still have water trapped between the liner and the hull. Heal the boat over and check under the bunks. Do it to both sides and the bow down and then stern down and only then suspect the bolts. If I have fixed everything else so I know no water is coming in I might go away for a day and then mop out the bilge again and recheck.

Window leaks

Cal-20’s have had two different windows from the factory over the years of production.

The first was a metal framed glass window. Window leaks were from two sources on these windows. The first was a failure of the bedding compound. Simply remove the screws on the inside and have someone catch the port as you push it out from the inside. Clean the frame and cabin side up with a putty knife and solvent. Bed the port back in place with widow caulk, Life caulk or foam tape. DO NOT USE 3M 5200 to bed windows or hardware.

The second leak source was a failure of the gasket in the window frame itself. The frame can be taken apart and the gasket replaced with caulk.

The second window used in the Cal’s was a plastic window made by GO Industries. The only leaks associated with these windows is a bedding failure so simply remove the windows, clean them up and bed them again with Lifeseal. Do not use any other sealant on these windows.

If you have broken windows or just want new ones ( they are lighter then glass ones) the Go Industries windows are still made and they will fit in any Cal 20. The windows are made by Mark Plastics in Corona, Ca.

Gel Coat, Crazing Cracks, Blisters and Fiberglass Repair

Gel coat is nothing more then polyester resin with talc and pigments added, it has no reinforcement and tends to be brittle. When the hulls, decks and liners are made they are built in a female mold. The gel coat is sprayed in first and to get good coverage in all the corners it often becomes thicker in spots then it should. This extra thickness is one of the reasons that gel coat cracks. For years these cracks have been called crazing cracks and owners have been told they are non structural. This may not be true in all cases.

The cracks that most concern us are the ones along the sides of the cockpit seats, companionway slider tracks and the bottom corners of the cockpit or companionway.

If any of these cracks are leaking water they should be repaired. Repairs amount to grinding away the surrounding area of the crack and laminating fiberglass across the crack to bridge the weak spot. Once repaired paint or gel coat can be used to replace the color.

Blisters are caused by the fact that the hulls are laminated of polyester resin as is the gel coat. The molecular make up of polyester resin is a loose structure which will allow water vapor transfer.

Here is how it happens, water vapor penetrates the gel coat and laminate until it finds an air bubble or pocket. It may be that it finds a bit of dirt or contaminate, maybe some extra Cobalt or MEKP (used to promote and cause the cure of the resin to take place). When the moisture finds any of these defects it will form a gas pocket due to a reaction with the defect and a blister is formed.

When blisters are small they are nothing more then a nuisance and tend to degrade performance by disturbing the water flow past the hull. When they get big they can start to be structural.

What is small and what is big and how do I fix them? Small is anything from the size of a pencil eraser to the size of a quarter and big is any thing larger.

Repairs can be as simple as taking a small grinder to the bottom and grinding out each blister. This can be tedious work if there are a lot as you must grind a little dish into the hull so that the blister is all gone. In the case of small blisters an epoxy putty can be used to fill the areas back up to smooth. Larger areas may need fiberglass laminated to rebuild the strength of the hull.

In extreme cases the entire gel coat is removed, the hull is allowed to dry out and then a barrier coat is applied after the blisters have been repaired.

Fiberglass repair is not hard if the project is small, repairs to hulls after a port/starboard collision is another matter and best left to the professionals.

Small fiberglass repair consists of analyzing why it is required in the first place. The cracks at the bottom of the companionway opening caused because there was no support under the cockpit will not stay repaired if the cockpit is not supported so analyze the cause before you repair.

The fiberglass must be ground away into a taper on each side of the defect. The rule of thumb is the taper should be 20/1 or 40/1 in high load areas. What this means is the defect in a ¼” thick hull will require a repair area of 5-10” on each side of the defect. Care should be exercised to replace the laminate with a similar laminate to what is being removed. In short you can not expect to replace woven roving with a repair of mat.

All of the flat panels in or Cal-20’s are stiffened with marine plywood.

Long time contamination with moisture will cause it to rot. Take a look at the deck around the lower shroud chain plate attachments as they are often in the worse condition. If the backing block (another piece of plywood) is rotten the deck is probably rotten as well.

Let’s assume this is your only rot problem. It is possible to remove the deck fitting, pry off the backing plate and then tap around the underside of the deck with a small hammer and listen. The areas that are rotten will sound dead (like you have just tapped on a book and opposed to tapping on your desk). Mark the area with a marker pen and cut the plywood out using a chisel and hammer. Do a neat job of it and if when you are done the area is small (less the 4-6 square inches) cut a new piece of plywood to fit the hole and glue it in with epoxy.

At this point you have eliminated the rot and replaced it with a filler block. You need to now replace the backing block which will have to be thicker and bigger then the old one as you are trying to spread the load. I would use a piece of ½” plywood about 8”x12” or bigger if necessary.

If your repair cut out area was larger you will need to grind or cut a taper in the deck plywood and grind a taper on the plywood you are going to put back forming a scarf like you would in fiberglass repair except that it only needs to be a 12/1 taper.

If the deck in your boat is in very bad condition you will need to plan for a winter of it and take the keel off and roll the boat upside down. Strip out all the plywood and glue in new. Come talk with me if you plan on this project as there are some helpful hints.

You now know why it is important to fix leaks and to keep water out of the boat. It is also important to provide ventilation so moisture in the boat will dissipate.

One side note here and that is when storing your boat out of the water in the winter time be sure to not tarp it down tight but provide ventilation. Also the boat will need to be stored slightly bow down so that water will not collect on the cockpit seats and flow into the seat hatch.

Painting Your Cal-20

Painting is all about preparation, the better the preparation the better the job will be.

There was a long discussion earlier on bottom preparation for racing and the bottom paint is applied with a thin foam roller to keep the film thickness thin.

Painting the hull sides of your Cal or new stripes are similar to doing the bottom except that the sand paper used to prepare the surface is 220-320 grit.

If you are going to paint the hull sides take the rub rail off first so you will have a professional looking job. Mask out what you don’t want painted and do the job early in the day before the breeze comes up. We here at Schooner creek paint in a heated indoor spray area with filtered ventilation. We spray the paint to give a perfect finish. DO NOT Spray at home.

There is a nice video of rolling and tipping on U-tube see pg.

To do the nonskid areas of the deck be sure you get all wax or other contaminates cleaned first, then sand or scotch-bright all the surfaces to be painted to break any shine. Then do your final masking and clean up before painting. I have found it best if you are going to add some type of nonskid material to the paint DON’T. Take the can of particles and punch a bunch of holes in the top like a salt shaker, roll your paint on and while it is still wet shake the particles on. Do a good job of getting more on then can absorb into the paint. Come back the next day and vacuum up all the extra and then roll on another coat of paint. It will look great.

I am no expert on outboards but here is what I have learned over the years.

Buy the lightest motor for the power requirements you need.

The Cal-20 can be pushed along nicely with a 3hp short shaft outboard if you are using the well.

If you are mounting the motor on the transom be sure to put a big backing block on the inside and watch where you mount the bracket (check with other owners).

The trick with using the well is getting the motor and motor plate in and out and keeping the water in the well from swamping the cockpit while motoring.

The trick of motor in and out is most of the forward way must be stopped before the change. The same goes for putting in the plate. I have an arrow on the inside of my plate to tell me which way is forward. When I go to put it in I shove it down with the front edge up until the last second when I pull up quickly on the line between the plate and top cover. If you have ever done other you may have had a very exciting moment while the plate was trying to pull you down and through the motor well.

Just remember to slow the boat up when taking the plate in or out.

As for keeping the water from sloshing up into the cockpit the best solution I have found is a piece of 3-4” foam rubber cut just larger then the hole in the well with a “V” notch cut half way into the back of the foam so you can pull it around the motor as you shove it into the hole. The foam does a great job of stopping the water and is easy to deal with when storing the engine.

When ever you are going to put the engine back into the locker be sure that you have shut the fuel off, closed the vent and run the engine to get rid of any fuel still in the carburetor.

Watch your fuel to oil mix carefully if you have an old two stroke and carry spare spark plugs and wrench. Better yet change a plug once before going out this spring just so you know how to do it and have all the tools you need.

When putting the boat away for the winter drain the fuel from the tank and put in new fuel in the spring.

Internet links and U-tube demonstrations

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gjyzc4c9JnE Painting by Rolling and tipping

http://www.sealsspars.com/index.html Steve Seals site for parts

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/rebedding_hardware&page=1 Bedding hardware to prevent leaks

http://express27.org/articles/stoppingleaks Stopping leaks

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsoKAHU5xUw Fiberglass repair

http://www.westsystem.com/ss/fast-blister-repair-with-six1/ Blister repair

http://www.cal20.com/ClassAssociation/Bylaws/tabid/63/Default.aspx Cal-20 By-Laws

http://www.bassboatcentral.com/2strokecare.htm 2 stroke outboard care

http://sailingvoyage.com/photos/index.php/Cal-20-Restoration Restoration of a Cal-20

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cal 20 sailboats

Cal 20: A popular boat still in the race despite not being built

cal 20 sailboats

SAN PEDRO ― The California 20 was a boat in demand in the 1960s, but production on the popular sailboat halted in 1975 for reasons unknown. Cal 20s are still popular today despite being out of production and were on full display during a recent sailing event in San Pedro.

Cabrillo Yacht Club hosted the 56th annual Cal 20 Class Championship in Los Angeles Harbor, Sept. 22-24.

Alamitos Bay Yacht Club Commodore Chuck Clay, who won the championship in the past, hoped to win it all this year but finished in second place; he also placed second in 2016.

skipper Keith Ives sailing Cal 20

Clay said after coming across some waves, Ives took the lead. Ives ended up in first place his second year in a row.

The winds were steady for the first couple days of the race kicking up a bit towards the end of the second day. The winds took the championship up a notch on the final race day.

“Sunday started out at about 10 knots and got up to 13-14 knots,” Clay mentioned. “There was a lot of kelp. We caught kelp, and everybody got kelp which was very frustrating.”

The simple design of the Cal 20 makes this boat easy to rig and a breeze to sail. The boat’s design, which fits a two to three-person crew, provides sailing with comfort and ease.

C. William Lapworth designed the Cal 20 in 1960. The fiberglass sailboats were built at Jensen Marine Factory in Costa Mesa. Jensen Marine was bought out by Bangor Punta in 1965, and the factory relocated to Tampa Florida in 1981 and then relocated again to Massachusetts.

The production of Cal boats ceased all together in 1989.

“The Cal 20 is a great boat for One Design sailing,” Clay stated.

Stephen Ashley also competed in the three-day race and agreed with Clay.

“One great thing about doing a One Design fleet is it’s really easy to figure out how you are doing [during the race],” Ashley said.  “With the Cal 20, it’s simple. If a guy is ahead of you, you’re losing. If a guy is behind you, you’re winning. That’s one of the things that make it fun.

“Chuck’s one of the best,” Ashley added. “They’re hard boats to do really well in because you have got to be right on your game to sail against someone of his caliber.”

Clay mentioned the Cal 20 is very affordable compared to other sailboats of this size.

A well maintained Cal 20 can be purchased or sold for around $2,000, according to Clay. A Cal 20 with upgrades can range in price from $6,000 up to $10,000.

One doesn’t necessarily need to own a Cal 20, however, to enjoy the sailboat.

Ashley teaches sailing classes on the Cal 20s in Long Beach. He is a member of Shoreline Yacht Club, trustee of a Cal 20, and treasurer of the SYC Sailing Foundation as well as an instructor.

The SYC Sailing Foundation is a 501(c)3 charitable organization and maintains a fleet of Cal 20s.

The boats are kept at the slips in front of Shoreline Yacht Club. The yacht club offers a place to teach sailing students in a classroom setting for the first day, and the harbor is where the students sail for the rest of the lessons.

Anyone can take the seasonal classes offered May through September even without a yacht club membership. Students can continue to charter the boats on a quarterly basis based on availability at a reasonable cost following the class and after passing a safety and skipper test.

One may not need to own or partially own a Cal 20 to compete in future regattas either.

Currently, the rules and regulations for Cal 20 competitions require the skipper to have at least one third ownership of the boat.

Ashley said the idea behind the ownership rule is to have people racing the boats who have an interest in the boats.

“We want people who are invested in the boats and have a long term investment in the program,” Ashley stated. “The downside [to the ownership rule] is that the group keeps getting older every year, and there are not a lot of new sailors coming into Cal 20s at the ownership level.”

Amending the bylaws to allow for more participation in Cal 20 regattas are currently being considered.

“Times have changed and participation is down,” Clay said. “So we’ve got to go with the changes to keep the class alive.”

Erin Rustigian photos

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The Cal 20 is a 20.0ft fractional sloop designed by C. William Lapworth and built in fiberglass by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats between 1961 and 1975.

1945 units have been built..

The Cal 20 is a light sailboat which is a high performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a racing boat.

Cal 20 sailboat under sail

Cal 20 for sale elsewhere on the web:

cal 20 sailboats

Main features

Model Cal 20
Length 20 ft
Beam 7 ft
Draft 3.33 ft
Country United states (North America)
Estimated price $ 0 ??

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cal 20 sailboats

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Sail area / displ. 20.07
Ballast / displ. 46.15 %
Displ. / length 149.27
Comfort ratio 12.12
Capsize 2.24
Hull type Monohull fin keel with transom hung rudder
Construction Fiberglass
Waterline length 18 ft
Maximum draft 3.33 ft
Displacement 1950 lbs
Ballast 900 lbs
Hull speed 5.69 knots

cal 20 sailboats

We help you build your own hydraulic steering system - Lecomble & Schmitt

Rigging Fractional Sloop
Sail area (100%) 195 sq.ft
Air draft 0 ft ??
Sail area fore 80.30 sq.ft
Sail area main 115 sq.ft
I 22 ft
J 7.30 ft
P 23 ft
E 10 ft
Nb engines 1
Total power 0 HP
Fuel capacity 0 gals

Accommodations

Water capacity 0 gals
Headroom 0 ft
Nb of cabins 0
Nb of berths 0
Nb heads 0

Builder data

Builder Jensen Marine/Cal Boats
Designer C. William Lapworth
First built 1961
Last built 1975
Number built 1945

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cal 20 sailboats

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cal 20 sailboats

The Cal 20 is an American sailboat, that was designed by C. William Lapworth and first built in 1961. A total of 1,945 Cal 20s were built during its 14-year production run.

The Cal 20 is a small recreational keelboat, built predominantly of fiberglass. It has a fractional sloop rig, a transom-hung rudder and a fixed fin keel with a weighted bulb. It displaces 1,950 lb (885 kg) and carries 900 lb (408 kg) of ballast. The boat has a draft of 3.33 ft (1.01 m) with the standard keel fitted and is normally fitted with a small outboard motor for docking and maneuvering.

The boat has a PHRF racing average handicap of 279 with a high of 291 and low of 270. It has a hull speed of 5.69 kn (10.54 km/h).

Source: Wikipedia . Image Credit: Alamitos Bay Yacht Club

LOA: 20.00 ft LWL: 18.00 ft Beam: 7.00 ft Draft: 3.33 ft Displacement: 1950.00 lbs Ballast: 900.00 lbs Hull type: Fin w/transom hung rudder Hull construction: FG Rigging type: Fractional Sloop

Cal 20 for sale in the last 12 months

Below you'll find the latest Cal 20 listings for the last 12 months. We compare the listing price with boats listed in the past and the color coding indicates if the price is good (green = below the average listing price) or more on the expensive side (red = seller is asking more than the average listing price).

Date Year
Country, State
Price Details
2023-09-111965
USD 800

Cal 20 listing prices over time

Listing details.



Cal Jensen Cal 20



The URL for this page is

Cal 20 Added 18-May-2023




cal 20 sailboats

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What about a cal 20? Any exp?

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A couple of questions since my deal with the Lightning fell through. If anyone has had a cal 20 or has been crew on one, where the hell are the life-lines? is the thing entirely sailed from the cockpit? No hiking out? I crew on a J-24 in SF bay. You need life lines, people hydro-plane off decks all the time. I did it a month ago and it was only 15-20 knot winds ( and saw another guy go in on another boat). I got my legs wet; half man overboard, thanks to the life lines. Anyway, I'm looking at a cal 20 tomorrow after the race (Berkeley Mid-winters) and would like some feedback for the community on this boat. This will be my first sailboat.  

Check out the Cal page on this site. Jim has some excellent photos of his restoration of a 20. Don't worry about the life-lines, you'll be hanging on to that ride! Surf-boards don't have life-lines either. And, if I'm not mistaken, i believe there is a pretty active Cal 20 racing assoc. on SF bay.  

Lifelines and pulpits used to be, and I think still are, options on smaller boats, although most people opt for them. I prefer having lifelines, but people shouldn't be going MOB very frequently, either with or without lifelines. If they are, they might be waiting too long before they re-position themselves after a tack. You always need to situate yourself so that you have solid footing, a low center of gravity, and a strong grip on the boat. When tacking, you shouldn't wait too long before you start moving from the old high side to the new high side of the boat. You should start moving to the other side when the skipper starts the tack, and not wait until he has completed it. If you wait until the tack is completed, you have a steep climb to get to the high side, and might have to do it with wet shoes. For a sailor, the first order of business is to make sure he stays on the boat. Everything else is secondary.  

cal 20 sailboats

JimDaddy said: Anyway, I'm looking at a cal 20 tomorrow after the race (Berkeley Mid-winters) and would like some feedback for the community on this boat. This will be my first sailboat. Click to expand...

Thanks for the links Thanks for all the info! I looked at a sad cal 20 yesterday after the Berkeley Mid-winters. It needs quite a bit of cosmetics and wood work. I'm going to wait for a nice one to come available locally. I'm also considering the Santana 22; very active class here in the bay area. Thanks again for the links! Great restore job on the linked cal 20!  

JimDaddy said: I'm also considering the Santana 22; very active class here in the bay area. Click to expand...
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Cal 20 Specifications

Sailing the Cal 20

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4/24/06, , Nashville, Tennessee, $2,500
, Corpus Christi, Texas, $2400
6/30/16, , Corpus Christi, Texas, $1,800
4/30/16, , Gloucester, Virginia, $1,700
4/27/12, , Oceanside, California, $3,000
8/19/07, , Okmulgee, Oklahoma, $3,500
11/9/17, , Marshall Ford Marina, Lake Travis, Texas, $1,520
10/10/15, , Humboldt County, California, $3,000
1/12/10, , Sarnia, Ontario, Canada, $3,000
10/1/07, , Bulverde, Texas, $1,250
9/10/19, , So. West Virginia, $1,140
1/24/16, , Fayetteville, Arkansas, $850
3/3/10, , San Antonio, Canyon Lake, Texas, $900
3/27/07, , San Antonio, Texas, $1,200
12/9/04, , Waianae, Hawaii, FREE
6/27/12, , Richland Chambers Lake, Corsicana, Texas, $300
5/6/08, , Rush Creek Yacht Club, Lake Ray Hubbard, Texas, $3,000
9/7/06, , Bastrop, Texas, $2,200
4/14/06, , Rush Creek Yacht Club, Lake Ray Hubbard, Dallas, Texas, $2,750
1/22/06, , near Austin, Texas, $1,800

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  • Sailboat Guide

1963 Cal 20

  • Description

Seller's Description

My Dad recently passed away and we need to sell his beloved clean and fresh 1963 Cal 20 sailboat. He had owned this boat for about 40 years and had totally upgraded it and meticulously maintained it. The inside is all new and complete with many upgraded compartments and shelves. The hull, bottom, and deck have been freshly painted. The hardware is new and reinforced to the deck. A cool new manual bilge pump has recently been added as well as a new jib furling system. The boat comes with everything you could need to sail and more including motor, sails, custom made trailer and other related equipment. The only flaw that my dad didn’t get a chance to correct was that his new anti skid deck paint job didn’t cure correctly and is peeling so it will need to be reapplied which in no way keeps it from being completely sail ready. My dad was an avid racer and raced regularly with the Wilmette, IL boat club mainly skippering Dolphin class sailboats with his friends. He loved his Cal 20 and we would just like to find it a good home. We also have his fiberglass and white oak dingy he painstakingly restored to perfection if you are interested in purchasing that as well.

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

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CAL 20 Detailed Review

https://images.harbormoor.com/originals/e601c226-c6cb-435f-94d4-419addf7472e

If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of CAL 20. Built by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats and designed by C. William Lapworth, the boat was first built in 1961. It has a hull type of Fin w/transom hung rudder and LOA is 6.1. Its sail area/displacement ratio 20.03. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by undefined, runs on undefined.

CAL 20 has retained its value as a result of superior building, a solid reputation, and a devoted owner base. Read on to find out more about CAL 20 and decide if it is a fit for your boating needs.

Boat Information

Boat specifications, sail boat calculation, rig and sail specs, contributions, who designed the cal 20.

CAL 20 was designed by C. William Lapworth.

Who builds CAL 20?

CAL 20 is built by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats.

When was CAL 20 first built?

CAL 20 was first built in 1961.

How long is CAL 20?

CAL 20 is 5.49 m in length.

What is mast height on CAL 20?

CAL 20 has a mast height of 7.01 m.

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15 shot after a ‘sideshow’ took over a peaceful Juneteenth celebration, police say

Fifteen people were shot during a Juneteenth celebration in Oakland, California, police said...

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Fifteen people were shot after an illegal “sideshow” took over a peaceful  Juneteenth  celebration in Oakland, California, police said Thursday.

Investigators are seeking multiple shooters — more than 50 shell casings were recovered at the scene — following the violence Wednesday night at Lake Merritt, but no arrests had been made by Thursday afternoon.

About 20 vehicles -- mostly all-terrain vehicles and dirt bikes — arrived around 8:15 p.m. Wednesday and started a sideshow on the north side of the lake as 5,000 people attended the Juneteenth event.

Sideshows, also known as street takeovers , involve stunts like doughnuts, drifting and burnouts. Street takeovers often involve hundreds of spectators. Cars block access to an intersection, stopping traffic in all directions and making it harder for police to respond. It’s become a widespread problem around the country, including Oakland and other cities across the U.S.

Oakland Police Chief Floyd Mitchell on Thursday said one person walked across the hood of a sideshow vehicle. Multiple occupants got out and attacked the person, whose injuries required them to be hospitalized.

Some of the people in the crowd also attacked police officers, Mitchell said during a news conference. A woman was taken into custody for assaulting an officer while the officer was giving first aid to a gunshot victim.

Detectives are combing social media for leads to the shooters’ identities, Mitchell said.

At least one gunshot victim was in critical condition. The victims’ ages ranged from 20 to 30 years old. Other injuries included the loss of fingers and minor gunshot wounds.

“The opportunity to celebrate with your family and friends should never be marred by gunfire,” Mitchell said.

June 19, or Juneteenth, marks the day in 1865 enslaved people in Galveston, Texas found out they had been freed — after the end of the Civil War, and two years after President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.

Juneteenth was designated a federal holiday in 2021 and has become more universally recognized beyond Black America. Many people get the day off work or school, and there are a plethora of street festivals, fairs, concerts and other events.

In 2021, a  shooting during a Juneteenth celebration  at Lake Merritt left several people injured and a 22-year-old San Francisco man dead.

Copyright 2024 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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IMAGES

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  3. Cal 20

    cal 20 sailboats

  4. Boat and Class Overview

    cal 20 sailboats

  5. Cal 20

    cal 20 sailboats

  6. Cal 20

    cal 20 sailboats

VIDEO

  1. [UNAVAILABLE] Used 1969 Jensen Cal 34 in Long Beach, California

  2. [UNAVAILABLE] Used 1977 Liberty 28 in Orange Beach, Alabama

  3. Having fun sailing my Cal 20

  4. Sailing my Cal 20 in Haro Strait, 18 January 2009

  5. ΜΕΖΟΥΡΕΣ CAL.12 & CAL.20

  6. Cal 28 Raised Deck Sailing San Diego

COMMENTS

  1. CAL 20

    Discount Sails-Cal_20. Electric Yacht. New Rudders. SeaWaterPro. SBD App - BR. top 1 ads row1. top 2 ads row2. top 3 ads row2. CAL 20. Save to Favorites ... SA/Disp (100% fore triangle) and Disp/length ratios to create a guide to probable boat performance vs. other boats of comparable size. For boats of the same length, generally the higher ...

  2. Cal 20

    61st Class Champs on Friday - Sunday, September 8 - 10. Cabrillo Beach Yacht Club, San Pedro California. Make plans now for sailing at the 2023 Cal 20 Class Championships. We will be racing at the infamous "Hurricane Gulch.". Given the September date, you can expect a bit less breeze than what is seen mid Summer which will make this ...

  3. Boat and Class Overview

    Cal 20 "One design sailing for everyone…". The California 20 was designed by C. William Lapworth in 1960 and went into production in 1961. It quickly became the most popular of the Cal line of fiberglass sailboats and 1,945 of the boats were built.

  4. Cal 20

    The Cal 20 is an American sailboat, that was designed by C. William Lapworth and first built in 1961. Production. The boat ... The Cal 20 is a small recreational keelboat, built predominantly of fiberglass. It has a fractional sloop rig, a transom-hung rudder and a fixed fin keel with a weighted bulb. It displaces 1,950 lb (885 kg) and carries ...

  5. Cal 20 Sailboat Boats for sale

    1968 Jensen Marine Cal 20 fiberglass sailboat. 20' length, 7' beam. Fixed keel with 850lb ballast. 3'4" draft. 8' cockpit. 2009 4hp Suzuki 4-stroke outboard motor included. Long shaft. Only 62.6hrs. Very reliable and uses very little gas. Recently refinished trailer with new tires included. Jib and main sail are in good condition. No spinnaker.

  6. Cal 20

    Cal 20 is a 20′ 0″ / 6.1 m monohull sailboat designed by C. William Lapworth and built by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats and Calgan Marine Ltd. between 1961 and 1975.

  7. Steve Rander's Cal 20 Guide

    Rig Adjustment at the dock. Most Cal-20's are setting up their rigs so that they can rake aft up wind and rock forward down wind. Start with the rig loose enough and with enough toggles in the Headstay to allow the measurements in the drawing to be reached 28' +/- 1" from the upper black band to the top of the transom.

  8. Cal 20: A popular boat still in the race despite not being built

    A Cal 20 with upgrades can range in price from $6,000 up to $10,000. One doesn't necessarily need to own a Cal 20, however, to enjoy the sailboat. Ashley teaches sailing classes on the Cal 20s in Long Beach. He is a member of Shoreline Yacht Club, trustee of a Cal 20, and treasurer of the SYC Sailing Foundation as well as an instructor.

  9. CAL boats for sale

    Some of the best-known CAL models currently listed include: 2-46, 2-30, 25II Mk II, 33-2 and 35. Various CAL models are currently offered for sale by specialized yacht brokers, dealers and brokerages on YachtWorld, with listings ranging from 1965 year models up to 2004. Find CAL boats for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld.

  10. Cal 20

    The Cal 20 is a 20.0ft fractional sloop designed by C. William Lapworth and built in fiberglass by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats between 1961 and 1975. 1945 units have been built. The Cal 20 is a light sailboat which is a high performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a racing boat.

  11. Cal 20 Sailboat values and recent boats for sale

    The Cal 20 is an American sailboat, that was designed by C. William Lapworth and first built in 1961. A total of 1,945 Cal 20s were built during its 14-year production run. The Cal 20 is a small recreational keelboat, built predominantly of fiberglass. It has a fractional sloop rig, a transom-hung rudder and a fixed fin keel with a weighted bulb.

  12. PDF Cal 20 Sailing Guide

    The competitive crew weight for the Cal 20 is between 340 and 500 lbs. It does seem that it is faster to be on the heavier side of the weight range. Move the crew weight as far forward as the cockpit will allow in all conditions. In light air, the crew weight should be as low in the boat as possible to reduce the pitching of the boat.

  13. 1974 Cal Jensen Cal 20 sailboat for sale in Florida

    8'. 3.5'. Florida. $3,500. Description: For sale is a 1974 Cal 20. I purchased this boat as a project a few years back and have put a lot of work into refitting it. Since I started, however, I got married and decided to buy a larger boat, suitable for two people to live aboard. Cal 20s are sturdy and inexpensive boats that can be fitted as ...

  14. Cruising On A Cal 20

    Willy, A 20 foot Cal is a little light for my taste. You might have problems carrying enough provisions because carrying capacity and the boats displacement are related. The heaver the boat the more weight you can carry is a general rule.

  15. What about a cal 20? Any exp?

    The jib on the fractional rig of the Cal 20 pretty much sweeps the foredeck (as I learned when we quickly lost our expensive solar powered fan up there). Having lifelines would interfere with that. I believe this is the same reason why other 20 foot boats, like the Ranger 20, don't have lifelines.

  16. Cal (California) 20 by Jensen Marine

    The Cal 20 or California 20 was built between 1961 and 1975 by Jensen Marine. The Cal 20, designed by Lapworth in 1960, went into production in 1961. It quickly became popular due to it's low price tag of $3200 and this low priced sailboat soon became the #1 seller for Jensen Marine. Jensen Marine would soon be building a 20 footer each day !

  17. Cal 20 Sailboat Photo Gallery

    Ballast = 875 pounds. The California 20 was designed by Lapworth in 1960 and the first was built in 1961. Popular due to it's low price tag of $3,200 during most of the 1960's. The #1 seller for Jensen Marine, soon producing a 20 footer daily. With four bunks, lots of storage, an eight foot cockpit and a marine head the Cal 20 was popular.

  18. CAL 20-Foot Sailboats & Yachts

    CAL 20-Foot Sailboats & Yachts. Take the New CAL 21 Yacht out for a Quick Launch (1969) CAL boats the most successful racing-cruising boats in the world. Like the bigger ocean racers, the CAL 21 is self-righting and self-bailing. GG Archives REF: BPCJM-013-1969-BW-AD ...

  19. 1963 Cal 20

    Seller's Description. My Dad recently passed away and we need to sell his beloved clean and fresh 1963 Cal 20 sailboat. He had owned this boat for about 40 years and had totally upgraded it and meticulously maintained it. The inside is all new and complete with many upgraded compartments and shelves. The hull, bottom, and deck have been freshly ...

  20. Cal 20

    Location: Hayes, Virginia. Boat: 1962 28' Pearson Triton. Posts: 289. Cal 20 = cold ravioli. Crossing Charlotte Harbor on Florida's Gulf coast in the spring of 1979 in 25 kts of wind on our way to Cayo Costa during a two-week cruise aboard our Cal 20; my parents, younger sister, and I (who camped ashore).

  21. Sail CAL boats for sale

    Find Sail CAL boats for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld. Offering the best selection of CAL boats to choose from.

  22. Cal 20 Sail Data

    Complete Sail Plan Data for the Cal 20 Sail Data. Sailrite offers free rig and sail dimensions with featured products and canvas kits that fit the boat. ... Sailboat Data ; Cal 20 Sail Data ; Cal 20 Sail Data. Pinit. SKU: X-SD-4584 . Quantity discounts available . Quantity Price; Quantity -+ Add to Cart . You may also like. Sheet Bag Kits ...

  23. CAL 20: Reviews, Specifications, Built, Engine

    CAL 20 Detailed Review. If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of CAL 20. Built by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats and designed by C. William Lapworth, the boat was first built in 1961. It has a hull type of Fin w/transom hung rudder and LOA is 6.1.

  24. 15 shot after a 'sideshow' took over a peaceful Juneteenth ...

    About 20 vehicles -- mostly all-terrain vehicles and dirt bikes — arrived around 8:15 p.m. Wednesday and started a sideshow on the north side of the lake as 5,000 people attended the Juneteenth ...

  25. Putin 'flexes his missiles' by sending warships within 100 ...

    CNN's Matthew Chance reports on ships that the Russian defense ministry describes as a "strike group," including a nuclear-powered submarine armed with modern "Caliber" cruise missiles ...