Give up the ghost

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Give up the ghost is an idiom that may be traced back as far as the 1600s. We will examine the definition of the phrase give up the ghost , where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

To give up the ghost means to expire or die, or in the case of a mechanical object, to stop working . The phrase give up the ghost may be traced back to the King James Bible, printed in the early 1600s. The term is used in several places in the Bible, including Mark 15:37: “And Jesus cried with a loud voice, and gave up the ghost.” The phrase is usually translated in these times as giving up one’s spirit, rather than ghost. Related phrases are gives up the ghost, gave up the ghost, given up the ghost, giving up the ghost. 

Examples Occasionally, usually in the middle of a dark, stormy night, a limb would give up the ghost, falling onto the roof and causing us to bolt upright in bed, dreading the mess that we’d face in the morning. (The Herald Times) It seems in his view that, even after death, spooks don’t give up the ghost of the human impulse to endure. ( The San Antonio Current ) Or the scandal-phobic Queen Vic, whose many positive qualities as a young queen are currently on display in PBS’s Victoria but whose contempt for and resentment of her charming but dissolute son just about ruined him as he waited — and waited — for her to give up the ghost. ( USA Today )

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Matthew 27:49

give up the ghost

  • 1.1 Etymology
  • 1.2 Pronunciation
  • 1.3.1 Translations
  • 1.4 See also

English [ edit ]

Etymology [ edit ].

Literally, to release one's spirit or soul from the body at death. From Middle English " gaf up þe gost ", " ʒave up þe gost ", from Old English phrases as " hēo āġeaf hire gāst " ( literally , "she gave up her ghost [spirit]"), " þæt iċ gāst mīnne āġifan mōte " ( literally , "that I must give up my ghost [spirit]"). Compare German den Geist aufgeben and Dutch de geest geven .

Perhaps most notable and survived in modern English for being used in traditional translation during the death of Jesus during His crucifixion: The Holy Bible,   [ … ] ( King James Version ), London: [ … ] Robert Barker ,   [ … ] , 1611, →OCLC , Matthew 27:50 : “¶ Iesus, when hee had cried againe with a loud voice, yeelded vp the ghost .”

Pronunciation [ edit ]

Verb [ edit ].

give up the ghost ( third-person singular simple present gives up the ghost , present participle giving up the ghost , simple past gave up the ghost , past participle given up the ghost )

  • 1611 , The Holy Bible,   [ … ] ( King James Version ), London: [ … ] Robert Barker ,   [ … ] , →OCLC , Mark 15:37 : And Ieſus cryed with a loude voice, and gaue vp the ghoſt .
  • ( intransitive , idiomatic , figuratively ) To quit ; to cease functioning. My old computer finally gave up the ghost the other day.
  • 1993 February 8, “A Magical History Tour”, in Time : But McCartney, 50, is hardly ready to give up the ghost of his creative past.
  • 1995 , Bad Boys : Burnett holds the door while Lowrey holds Francine. She's broken, crying, and giving up the ghost of her past.
  • 2000 January 14, Kevin Maney, “Gates closes an era Microsoft prepares to lay out a road map”, in USA Today : Its Windows CE, ostensibly for consumer electronics, is flailing, largely because Microsoft has taken a PC mentality to develop CE, unable to give up the ghost of its heritage.

Translations [ edit ]

See also [ edit ].

  • draw one's last breath

gave up the ghost

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The meaning and origin of the expression: Give up the ghost

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Give up the ghost

  • Death and dying

What's the meaning of the phrase 'Give up the ghost'?

To die, or in the case of inanimate objects, to cease working.

What's the origin of the phrase 'Give up the ghost'?

There are many uses of this phrase in the Bible, including this, from Miles Coverdale's Version, 1535, Acts 12:23:

Immediatly the angell of the LORDE smote him, because he gaue not God the honoure: And he was eaten vp of wormes, and gaue vp the goost.

The metaphorical use of the phrase, that is, in relation to something not living and not able to become a ghost, is 19th century; for example, James Kirke Paulding's, Westward Ho! , 1832, includes:

"At length it gave up the ghost, and, like an over-cultivated intellect, became incurably barren."

Gary Martin - the author of the phrases.org.uk website.

By Gary Martin

Gary Martin is a writer and researcher on the origins of phrases and the creator of the Phrase Finder website. Over the past 26 years more than 700 million of his pages have been downloaded by readers. He is one of the most popular and trusted sources of information on phrases and idioms.

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Definition of give up

transitive verb

intransitive verb

Examples of give up in a Sentence

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'give up.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Dictionary Entries Near give up

give up on (someone or something)

Cite this Entry

“Give up.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/give%20up. Accessed 1 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

Kids definition of give up, more from merriam-webster on give up.

Nglish: Translation of give up for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of give up for Arabic Speakers

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Definition of 'to give up the ghost'

  • to give up the ghost

Examples of 'to give up the ghost' in a sentence to give up the ghost

Browse alphabetically to give up the ghost.

  • to give something a body swerve
  • to give something houseroom
  • to give the game away
  • to give vent to
  • to give way
  • to give your word of honour
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The Origin Of The Phrase Give Up The Ghost

A ghost in the woods

Have you ever heard someone use the phrase, "Give up the ghost ?" Maybe you have, but there's also a good chance you haven't. It's not really a common idiom that arises in conversation anymore, but you may have seen it pop up in various works of literature from centuries past. It sounds creepy, doesn't it? Still, what does it mean when someone "gives up the ghost?" Are we referring to someone who is holding an actual apparition hostage? Are we demanding that they release the paranormal entity from forced captivity? Someone should really give an explanation already.

Well, the meaning of the phrase is quite simple and almost self-explanatory: to give up the ghost means to die, according to The Free Dictionary by Farlex . So in a sense, we are talking about releasing a ghost from captivity — our own ghost from the captivity of our own bodies — and death is the key to the prison. 

Where did the phrase originate?

Like so many other phrases that have been casually woven into common vernacular over centuries past, "give up the ghost" traces its origins all the way back to  The Holy Bible . In the Book of Job (4:10), the exact dialogue reads, "Man dieth, and wasteth away: yea, man giveth up the ghost" (per The Free Dictionary by Farlex ). The explanation is right there in the words leading up to the phrase — death. Man dies and wastes away, and his ghost is relinquished unto the ether. 

It appears again in Mark 15:37 when, after suffering immensely upon the cross, "Jesus cried with a loud voice, and gave up the ghost." According to The Grammarist , the widespread use of the phrase in common language likely started to proliferate sometime in the 1600s after The King James Bible was published and made available to the masses.

Modern usage of the phrase

If you're a fan of Radiohead , you might already recognize the phrase from one of their more popular songs in recent years. " Give Up the Ghost " appeared on the band's 2011 album " The King of Limbs ." True to Radiohead form, the track seems to invoke something unnerving from within, yet somehow manages to comfort the listener at the same time. "Give Up the Ghost" is more or less the perfect song to give up the ghost to. 

Musicians seem to be rather keen on the phrase. " Give Up the Ghost " is also the title of Folk/Indie Rock singer Brandi Carlile's 2009 studio album. It's hard to argue that it doesn't make for a good song/record title, but songwriters alone certainly don't hold precedence over the timeless idiom. In 2004, author Hilary Mantel chose "Giving Up the Ghost: A Memoir" as the title for her own autobiography (via Goodreads ). 

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  • give up the ghost

Die, as in At ten o'clock he gave up the ghost . This expression, which employs ghost in the sense of “the soul or spirit,” may itself be dying out. [Late 1300s]

Words Nearby give up the ghost

  • give the time of day
  • give the word
  • give the works
  • give to understand
  • give vent to
  • give voice to
  • give way to
  • give what for

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

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What Does "Give up the Ghost" Mean?

Give up the ghost is an English saying that is most commonly associated with ceasing to exist or function. The more common application of this idiom has to do with death, with the implication being that at the point of death the body gives up the spirit or ghost, which is then free to move on to another sphere or realm. A slightly different application of give up the ghost is utilized when an individual chooses to cease working on what is perceived as a lost cause, or chooses to cease activity on some task that has proven beyond his or her capabilities.

The origins of the idiom give up the ghost are sometimes traced back to the earlier versions of the Christian Bible. Versions as early as the 16th century included the use of the phrase in the Book of Acts of the Apostles, found in the New Testament of the Christian scriptures. In this particular text, Herod is struck down by an angel of the Lord, and is said to give up the ghost, or die.

In English-speaking countries, "give up the ghost" is only one of many colorful expressions used to describe the act of death. Such phrases as passing away, kicking the bucket, cashing in one’s chips, headed for a dirt nap, and buying the farm are only a few of the idioms and expressions that are used in the place of simply saying that an individual has died. Some of the colorful phrases used to describe dying are intended to imply that the spirit of the deceased is moving on to another realm of existence, while others that are considered less somber are sometimes used to either ease the sorrow that occurs when a loved one dies or perhaps even celebrate the death of an individual who is not particularly popular.

While often having to do with death, a broader application of this phrase has to do with simply giving up. For example, if an individual works hard to make a success of a business but is unable to make any profit with the operation, he or she may choose to giver up the ghost and shut down the enterprise. In like manner, the phrase can even refer to giving up on a romantic situations, such as a suitor giving up the ghost when it becomes obvious that the object of his or her affection will never return those romantic feelings.

After many years in the teleconferencing industry, Michael decided to embrace his passion for trivia, research, and writing by becoming a full-time freelance writer. Since then, he has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including LanguageHumanities, and his work has also appeared in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and several newspapers. Malcolm’s other interests include collecting vinyl records, minor league baseball, and cycling.

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Discussion Comments

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  • By: Arestov Andrew The saying "give up the ghost" is usually associated with death, which allows one's spirit to move on.
  • By: Piotr Marcinski A suitor is “giving up the ghost” when it becomes obvious that the object of his or her affection will never return those romantic feelings.
  • By: Nikki Zalewski In the New Testament, Herod is struck down by an angel of the Lord, and is said to give up the ghost, or die.

Give Up the Ghost

gave up the ghost

There are all kinds of phrases and idioms we use day to day even though we have lost their origins. We know what they mean, we know when to use them, but we don’t know where we got them. In so many cases they come to us by way of the Bible, and especially the King James Bible. This is exactly the case with the common little phrase “Give up the ghost.”

The Expression

We use the expression “give up the ghost” to describe death—the disconnection of the soul (the ghost) from the body. Yet today we would not use the phrase in a solemn occasion (“We are gathered here today to honor our friend who gave up the ghost on Saturday”). Rather, we tend to use it humorously to describe the “death” of something that is inanimate or relatively unimportant, as in “My iPhone finally gave up the ghost.” A small-town newspaper laments , “History is strewn with towns that gave up the ghost when companies moved on” while a home renovation column in the Sydney Morning Herald begins “The vanity unit in our bathroom gave up the ghost recently, and as we are saving for a major renovation in a few years…” In this way we use it as a form of personification, to make it seem as if something has greater significance than it does intrinsically.

The phrase was popularized by the King James Version of the Bible, though the King James drew from the Coverdale Bible. The KJV uses it in a number of passages: Luke 23:46 and John 19:30 when describing the death of Jesus and Acts 12:23 when describing the death of Herod. “And immediately the angel of the Lord smote [Herod], because he gave not God the glory: and he was eaten of worms, and gave up the ghost.” Most current translation render “gave up the ghost” as “breathed his last” or simply “die.” A quick check of the Greek shows that the John passage is different from the others in that it explicitly references “pneuma” or “spirit.” Thus the ESV does well to translate it differently from the other two: “he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.” It is only here where “give up the ghost” is a literal rather than idiomatic expression.

The Application

Though the idiom is no longer used in modern Bible translations, it lives on in the culture around us. In this way it gives us reason to consider its significance. It is drawn most naturally from John 19:30 and, thus, from the most momentous event in human history—the death of Jesus Christ. There is much we can and should learn from it. We see that Jesus “gave up his spirit ” and this reminds us that Jesus was fully human even while he was fully God. There is and was unity of body and soul, of the material and the immaterial. And then we see that he “ gave up his spirit.” This reminds us of his uniqueness, for there was something active rather than passive in this “giving up.” To the end, Jesus was willingly enduring his suffering and sacrifice. Yes, he was dragged to the court and the cross, yes he was nailed to the tree, but all the while he was willing, he was still in control. He was willing to suffer in this way even while he had the power and authority to make it stop. This is consistent with what he said in John 10:17-18: “For this reason the Father loves me, because I lay down my life that I may take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again. This charge I have received from my Father.”

And finally, this little phrase is a call for us to remember that we, too, are more than bodies, more than what can be seen, touched, and killed. Though our bodies can and will be destroyed, in that moment we, too, will give up the ghost. The soul will live on until it is at last reunited to a body that is remade, restored, and perfected. This is the great promise of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Not surprisingly, many Christian songs express worship for these beautiful realities. “ In Christ Alone ” is a stirring example:

No guilt in life, no fear in death This is the power of Christ in me From life’s first cry to final breath Jesus commands my destiny No power of hell, no scheme of man Can ever pluck me from His hand; Till He returns or calls me home, Here in the power of Christ I’ll stand.

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What Does “Gave up the Ghost” Mean in Scripture?

  • Mike Leake Borrowed Light
  • Updated Jul 17, 2023

What Does “Gave up the Ghost” Mean in Scripture?

I had an old clunker of a car a few years ago. Ah, who am I kidding? I still have an old clunker just a different one. This particular car seemed to have nine lives. Each time I thought it was dead, somehow, we’d be able to find some cheap fix and get it back on the road again. But one day it drove its last mile. It simply wouldn’t start. When this happened, I remember saying, “well, the ol’ car finally gave up the ghost.” 

“Gave up the ghost” is a phrase that we use when something (seldom do we use it of someone these days) no longer is in working condition. It’s when a thing dies. But did you know this phrase has its origin in the Bible? 

Where Is "Gave up the Ghost" Found in Scripture? 

The phrase seems to have its origin in the Coverdale Bible. In Acts 12:23 , when Herod did not give glory to God but instead to himself, we read this: 

Immediatly the angel of the LORDE smote him, because he gave not God the honoure: And he was eaten vp of wormes, and gaue vp the goost.

Why Is This Phrase Used?

Why does the KJV Bible reference giving up a ghost? Is this some sort of reference to the Holy Ghost? No, it is not a reference to the Holy Ghost/Spirit. In Old and Middle English the word ghost was used synonymously with spirit. So “giving up the ghost” would be synonymous with “yielding your spirit”. 

It is in John 19:30 that I think we are better positioned to understand more about the origins of this phrase. The word used for “gave up” is paradidomi . This is a very common word. It is the same word used for Jesus being delivered over to the guards and authorities. It means that you are giving something over to another. And so in John 19:30 , we see that Jesus is yielding the very center of Himself (his pnuema) over to the Father. This is why the phrasing “give up the ghost” became more popular in the 17 th and 18 th century. It wasn’t simply that you were “pushing up daisies” or “taking a dirt nap” you were actually submitting your spirit to the LORD. 

What Does This Phrase Mean?

There is, then, even more meaning in this phrase than simply an idiom to refer to death. And its origins are certainly more profound than being synonymous for your car “kicking the bucket”. It doesn’t simply mean that something no longer functions or works. There is a yielding and submission of the darkest hour into the hands of the LORD. 

Jesus, of course, models this for us in the way that when he was dying upon the cross, he entrusted Himself to the Father. I appreciate the words of Tim Challies : 

The way someone died in the 17 th and 18 th centuries was incredibly important. Pastors and family members were looking for this type of yielding at the hour of departure. They had great comfort if someone went peacefully into eternity. It was just a final picture of submissively following the sovereign direction of the Lord. 

Eventually, the phrase took on a bit of a new life. The sacredness of death seemed to be overtaken with a more cynical outlook. As such “giving up the ghost” became a more macabre expression and eventually referred to simply death, or giving up. So, by 1832 James Kirke Paulding’s Westward Ho! would see an inanimate object; “at length it gave up the ghost…” 

I do not think it necessary for us to use archaic language to describe death. Very few people would understand the import of “gave up the ghost” if we said this at funerals. But the concept is indeed important. It is helpful for us to have things like graveside services where we commit the body as well as spirit unto the Lord as we await the resurrection of the dead. It is important for us to not only grasp the concept of being surrendered to the Lord in the hour of our death but also within every hour of our lives. 

Perhaps “giving up the ghost” shouldn’t be confined to the deathbed but in a very real sense, we are to be “giving up ourselves” with every waking moment. Jesus modeled this in his life and in his death.

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gave up the ghost

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Meaning of give up the ghost in English

Give up the ghost.

  • buy the farm idiom
  • depart this life idiom
  • strike someone down
  • suffocation
  • those whom the gods love die young idiom

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What Does it Mean that Jesus ‘Gave Up the Ghost’?

The phrase “gave up the ghost” is an old English translation of the Greek phrase “paradidōmi to pneuma.” The old English phrase means the moment a person dies as if the soul is released when the body transpires. 

What Does it Mean that Jesus ‘Gave Up the Ghost’?

I recently went to my uncle’s funeral. My uncle was a great man who loved his wife and family with all his heart. He lived a long life, almost 80, when he passed suddenly taking out the trash one evening.

We celebrated and grieved my uncle near his home in Ohio. We told stories and comforted one another. For those of faith, we declared we would see him again one day, as he was a man of faith and service in his local church.

Despite being older, his death was unexpected and quick. It was not what any of us would have chosen. I can’t say for sure, but perhaps it wasn’t what my uncle would have chosen, either. However, whether the death is sudden or at the end of a long illness, death is the appointment for us all.

Every human being is appointed to die once and then face the judgment seat of God ( Hebrews 9:27 )), where every knee will bow, and tongue will confess ( Philippians 2:10-11 ).

This is the future for all men and women. The time is appointed for us by God, not by our choosing, no matter what we believe. As sinners, we are already slaves of death.

This is the gospel that God sent his Son for the world so those who would believe in Jesus wouldn’t be slaves of death but have imperishable, eternal life.=

At the center of the gospel is the person, Jesus, who was sent as a sacrifice for our sins. This Son of God had never sinned and by extension, never under the slavery of death.

This is the background for a mysterious statement from the King James Version of the Bible. At his death on the cross, Jesus “gave up the ghost.”

What Is the Context When Jesus ‘Gave Up the Ghost’ in Luke 23:46 ?

Chapter 23 of Luke recounts the events leading up to the crucifixion and death of Jesus. Jesus had been arrested and tried by the Sanhedrin, the religious ruling council of the Jews, people who were supposed to be upholding the Old Testament Law and the truth of God.

Since the Jews were a conquered people, they didn’t have the authority to carry out a death sentence, so they sent Jesus to Pilate, the local Roman governor.

Luke 23 begins with Pilate’s questioning of Jesus. When Pilate realizes this is both a religious matter dealing with the local kingship of Judah, he sends Jesus to Herod.

Upon being questioned by Herod, Jesus said nothing, even though the chief priests and scribes accused Jesus. Herod and his troops mocked the Son of God, placing a type of kingly robe on him as a joke, and sent Jesus back to Pilate.

Pilate could still find nothing wrong with Jesus and decided to simply chastise Jesus and release him, since by local law and agreement with the Jews around Passover, he could release one prisoner to the Jews.

The Jewish leaders roused the people to instead called for Pilate to release murderous political revolutionary Barabbas. The Jews cried, “Crucify!” until Pilate relented and delivered Jesus up to be crucified.

Jesus forgives the men who drove the nails into his hands, all while being mocked by the crowd. If he was the Son of God and could do such miracles, why didn’t he save himself?

This is a valid question.

After dealing with the two thieves, one of whom is promised the Kingdom because he defends the innocence of Jesus, the sun darkened, and the veil of the Temple was torn in two.

At this point, we get to the crux of it. Luke 23:46 in the KJV says, “And when Jesus had cried with a loud voice, he said, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit: and having said thus, he gave up the ghost.”

He gave up the ghost.

What Was the Significance That Jesus ‘Gave Up the Ghost’?

The phrase “gave up the ghost” is an old English translation of the Greek phrase “ paradidōmi to pneuma .” The old English phrase means the moment a person dies as if the soul is released when the body transpires.

Other translations don’t use this old phrase for death, however. Even the New King James Version changes it to, “He breathed his last.”

Why is it important for the KJV to use “gave up the ghost”?

First, we can look into the text of Luke 23:46 to give a hint. What words did Jesus say before dying? Jesus said nothing randomly, nor did he speak of his own, as he clearly expressed. He only spoke what the Father spoke ( John 12:49 ), so these final words were intentional and had meaning.

Before his death, Jesus said, “Father, into Your hands I commend My spirit.” Here Jesus states he chose the moment of his death, that he had the power to choose exactly when he died.

Some might argue it is possible Jesus simply understood he was about to die; the moment was close. This happens to people who aren’t the Son of God, a mystical reality where regular everyday people sometimes know they are about to die and express it just beforehand.

Even without looking at other gospel accounts of his death, we see the moment carried extreme significance. The sky darkened. The veil was torn in two. These were important symbols of a spiritual breaking of the old ways and bringing of the New Covenant .

Further, we have other evidence from Jesus’ words of his power to choose when he died. In John 10:17-18 KJV, Jesus says, “Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again. No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.”

By his own words, then, Jesus told people no one took his life, Pilate, Herod, the Sanhedrin, or even the men putting the nails in his hands. It was completely his choice. The Father commanded, but Jesus chose to obey.

God is love, and love doesn’t force, coerce, or manipulate. Love speaks truth and gives a choice. Because Jesus was the Son of God and loved us and his Father, he obeyed; knowing the joy set before him ( Hebrews 12:2 ), he chose the cross.

Therefore, we see why the King James makes an interesting choice with the phrase, “gave up the ghost.” When used to describe the death of regular people, “giving up the ghost” doesn’t mean they chose to die in the moment, only that their soul left their body.

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But with Jesus, the term takes on a deeper meaning. He chose to come to the Earth as a man and die on the cross. Unlike every other human being, he had the power over death while alive and chose exactly when it would happen in obedience to his Father.

What do other accounts add to this discussion?

What are Other Gospel Accounts of the Moment of Jesus’ Death?

Luke is the only gospel recording Jesus’ words after crying out with a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit,” after crying out with a loud voice and immediately preceding “giving up the ghost.”

Mark and Matthew give us different last words from Jesus, which are “Eli, Eli, sabachtani?” which meant, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” ( Matthew 27:46 and Mark 13:34 ). Jesus says this when the darkness covers the Earth, also written about in the other Gospels.

However, both Matthew and Mark include Jesus crying out with a loud voice before he died, and afterward, Jesus yielded up his spirit.

Yielding his spirit is the same sentiment as “into your hands I commend my spirit” and “he gave up the ghost.” Jesus yielding his spirit also meant he chose to die at that moment.

John’s gospel provides a slightly different perspective on the moment of Jesus’ death. The final words in John 19:28-30 are “It is finished!” followed by bowing his head and giving up his spirit.

“It is finished” correlates with the completion of the work of Christ in salvation and also the signs around his death like the earthquake and the veil being torn in two.

Again, we have “he gave up his spirit” in death, a clear indication of a personal choice by Jesus to die exactly then, revealing his power over death even while living in a human body.

But didn’t he show this power over death in other narratives, as well? He raised the dead several times, notably Lazarus ( John 11 ). He declared during the raising of Lazarus that he, himself, was the resurrection and the life.

He who is resurrection and life cannot be subject to death in any way. He already was the resurrection before he physically manifested that reality in literally rising from the dead.

This is the life he gives to his followers.

What Are Important Lessons We Can Learn from Luke 23:46 ?

As stated before, God is love, and he will not force us to follow him. We must choose to die to ourselves and live for God. However, that choice is only available because Jesus paved the way, the firstborn from the dead, and invites us into a work we could not do.

We can’t overcome the power of death on our own. Only Jesus could accomplish that by choosing to die as the perfect righteous Son of God in a human body to defeat the power of death over humanity. This is a finished work Christ invites us into through faith and grace.

If we will believe, we can then make the choice. God will not force us. Nor will he manipulate or coerce us to love and follow him. Even the power to make the choice comes from his grace, which we don’t deserve and could never earn.

But if we do, then we also choose to die to ourselves and follow the teachings of the Bible.

Jesus said in Mark 8:34-35 , “When He had called the people to Himself, with His disciples also, He said to them, “Whoever desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me. For whoever desires to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake and the gospel’s will save it.”

Just like Jesus, we must see the joy before us, the eternal life offered, and endure our own cross. This is a life we would lose anyway since we are slaves of sin and death, and no amount of effort on our part can break those chains.

We must offer up our lives willingly, overcoming sin and death by the blood of the Lamb, the word of our own testimony , and not loving our own lives ( Revelation 12:11 ).

When we willingly choose to give up our lives for Jesus and the Gospel, the power of death over us is eternally broken. We are filled with the same Spirit that raised Jesus from the dead ( Romans 8:11 )). Jesus, who is the Resurrection, lives within us through the born-again New Creation. Even when our bodies die, we will be resurrected in new bodies like Jesus had ( 1 Corinthians 15:49 ).

Even Death itself can’t kill the Resurrection, and we are able to say now and later, along with all the saints of God, “Oh Death, where is your sting? Hades, where is your victory?”

Like Christ, let us give our lives, our souls, willingly unto the God who will translate us into an eternal life no worldly power can kill, giving us victory now and later over the power of Death.

For further reading:

What Did Jesus Mean by ‘Father, Into Your Hands I Commit My Spirit’?

What Is the Significance of Jesus’ Last Words on the Cross?

Is the Holy Ghost Different from the Holy Spirit?

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What does John 19:30 mean?

gave up the ghost

Matthew 27:50-51 King James Version

50  Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost.

51  And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent;

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  1. Give Up the Ghost

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  2. Give Up The Ghost

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  3. Genesis 25:8 KJV

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  4. Give up the ghost Meaning

    gave up the ghost

  5. John 19:30 When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, he said, It

    gave up the ghost

  6. HEBREW WORD STUDY

    gave up the ghost

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  1. Ghost now: ghost then

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  3. Is there a ghost? 😳🤣

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COMMENTS

  1. Give up the ghost Idiom Definition

    To give up the ghost means to expire or die, or in the case of a mechanical object, to stop working. The phrase give up the ghost may be traced back to the King James Bible, printed in the early 1600s. The term is used in several places in the Bible, including Mark 15:37: "And Jesus cried with a loud voice, and gave up the ghost.".

  2. GIVE UP THE GHOST

    GIVE UP THE GHOST definition: 1. to die 2. If a machine gives up the ghost, it stops working: 3. to stop trying to do something…. Learn more.

  3. Give up the ghost

    Definition of give up the ghost in the Idioms Dictionary. give up the ghost phrase. What does give up the ghost expression mean? Definitions by the largest Idiom Dictionary.

  4. Matthew 27:50

    The verse says that Jesus cried out again with a loud voice and yielded up his spirit when he was crucified. It is part of the account of his death and resurrection in the Bible. See different translations, cross references, audio, and context of the verse.

  5. give up the ghost

    Verb [ edit] give up the ghost (third-person singular simple present gives up the ghost, present participle giving up the ghost, simple past gave up the ghost, past participle given up the ghost) ( intransitive, idiomatic) To cease clinging to life; to die . Synonyms: yield up the ghost, yield the ghost; see also Thesaurus: die.

  6. The saying 'Give up the ghost'

    The metaphorical use of the phrase, that is, in relation to something not living and not able to become a ghost, is 19th century; for example, James Kirke Paulding's, Westward Ho!, 1832, includes: "At length it gave up the ghost, and, like an over-cultivated intellect, became incurably barren." By Gary Martin.

  7. Give up the ghost Definition & Meaning

    How to use give up in a sentence. to yield control or possession of : surrender; to desist from : abandon; to declare incurable or insoluble… See the full definition

  8. Definition of 'to give up the ghost'

    If someone gives up the ghost, they stop trying to do something because they no longer believe.... Click for English pronunciations, examples sentences, video.

  9. To give up the ghost

    give up the ghost. 1 (of a person) die. 2 (of a machine) stop working; break down, especially permanently. 3 stop making an effort; give up hope. The Old English meaning of ghost , 'the soul or spirit as the source of life', survives only in this idiom. See also: ghost, give, up.

  10. The Origin Of The Phrase Give Up The Ghost

    FOTOGRIN/Shutterstock. Like so many other phrases that have been casually woven into common vernacular over centuries past, "give up the ghost" traces its origins all the way back to The Holy Bible. In the Book of Job (4:10), the exact dialogue reads, "Man dieth, and wasteth away: yea, man giveth up the ghost" (per The Free Dictionary by Farlex ).

  11. GIVE UP THE GHOST Definition & Usage Examples

    Give up the ghost definition: . See examples of GIVE UP THE GHOST used in a sentence.

  12. What Does "Give up the Ghost" Mean?

    Give up the ghost is an English saying that is most commonly associated with ceasing to exist or function. The more common application of this idiom has to do with death, with the implication being that at the point of death the body gives up the spirit or ghost, which is then free to move on to another sphere or realm. A slightly different application of give up the ghost is utilized when an ...

  13. Origin of "Given up the ghost"

    Ghost can describe a person's soul or spirit (if you believe in such things), so if you give it up, possibly to some higher authority, you no longer have it and you die. Its use in that sense is very old, but the expression is probably more used now to describe less dramatic events, as in your example.

  14. Give Up the Ghost

    The KJV uses it in a number of passages: Luke 23:46 and John 19:30 when describing the death of Jesus and Acts 12:23 when describing the death of Herod. "And immediately the angel of the Lord smote [Herod], because he gave not God the glory: and he was eaten of worms, and gave up the ghost.". Most current translation render "gave up the ...

  15. What Does "Gave up the Ghost" Mean in Scripture?

    In Old and Middle English the word ghost was used synonymously with spirit. So "giving up the ghost" would be synonymous with "yielding your spirit". More modern translations will either ...

  16. GIVE UP THE GHOST definition

    GIVE UP THE GHOST meaning: 1. to die 2. If a machine gives up the ghost, it stops working: 3. to stop trying to do something…. Learn more.

  17. What Does it Mean that Jesus 'Gave Up the Ghost'?

    However, both Matthew and Mark include Jesus crying out with a loud voice before he died, and afterward, Jesus yielded up his spirit. Yielding his spirit is the same sentiment as "into your hands I commend my spirit" and "he gave up the ghost.". Jesus yielding his spirit also meant he chose to die at that moment.

  18. Radiohead

    [Intro] Don't hurt me, don't hurt me Don't hurt me, don't hurt me Don't hurt me [Verse 1] Gather up the lost and their souls (Don't hurt me) Into your arms (Don't hurt me) Into your arms (Don't ...

  19. John 19:30

    John 19:30King James Version. 30 When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, he said, It is finished: and he bowed his head, and gave up the ghost. Read full chapter. John 19:30 in all English translations. John 18. John 20. King James Version (KJV) Public Domain.

  20. What does John 19:30 mean?

    Whether literally, or as a statement of agreement, Scripture clarifies that Jesus is "giving up" His life to God the Father—it is not being stripped away from Him by force ( John 10:17-18 ). John 19:17-30 describes Jesus' unjust execution by crucifixion. The Roman governor, Pilate, ironically puts a sign on Jesus' cross proclaiming Him ...

  21. Genesis 35:29 KJV

    Genesis 35:29King James Version. 29 And Isaac gave up the ghost, and died, and was gathered unto his people, being old and full of days: and his sons Esau and Jacob buried him. Read full chapter. Genesis 35:29 in all English translations. Genesis 34. Genesis 36.

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    793 likes, 52 comments - nollywoodcitadel on March 1, 2024: "According to @femiakinyemi_official A comic nollywood actor TOLANI QUADRI OYEBAMIJI popularly kno..."

  23. Matthew 27:50-51

    Matthew 27:50-51King James Version. 50 Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost. 51 And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; Read full chapter. Matthew 26. Matthew 28. King James Version (KJV)